ISCA Secretariat: Vester Voldgade 100, 2, DK-1552 Copenhagen, Denmark Tel.: +45 29 48 55 51 / info@isca-web.org
  • ISCA interview with Nordea Foundation director Henrik Lehmann Andersen: "Why we are engaging in sports and cycling"
    Nordea Foundation Director Henrik Lehmann Andersen at the Journey of Hope opening event in Copenhagen. Photo: Nordea Foundation "Cycling is a perfect way to get more people moving. That's why the Nordea Foundation supports cycling playgrounds (cykellegebaner) and the 'On Bike with DGI' (På Cykel med DGI) project," the Danish Nordea Foundation wrote on Twitter on the opening day of the Journey of Hope event. Its Director, Henrik Lehmann Andersen, joined the celebration on 18 August and told ISCA why his foundation is getting behind this accessible mode of transport, why a cycling-friendly nation like Denmark can still learn from other countries, and what attracts him to an initiative. ISCA: What do you think are the messages that come out of an event like this, a Journey of Hope of long distance cycling by recreational cyclists? HLA: The message is that it’s for everybody. It’s not for specialists or extremely fit, Olympic Games-looking people, it’s for everybody. So that’s the main perspective and that’s why we are engaging ourselves, as a Danish foundation, in sports and in cycling. It’s not for the elite; it’s for everybody. So to get everybody to do it, to get everybody committed and to get everybody to learn how to do it, that’s the really important thing for us. ISCA: Do you think that’s also an important thing for active transport and promoting that around Europe as well?HLA: Of course there is a perspective in this thing on cycling across borders to connect people and to get people to know each other across borders and across cultures. That’s a really important thing too. But that’s not the issue of the foundation I work for.ISCA: Denmark in that sense has a lot to contribute in inspiring other countries. What do you think Denmark can get back from the other countries as inspiration in this kind of area? HLA: I think there is a lot of inspiration to catch up on from other countries, in fact every country. Sometimes you think you’re the centre of everything and that everybody else should learn from you, but there are always a lot of things you can learn from others. In this field, there’s a lot to learn from having a broader perspective on cycling – on how a lot of different communities work, on the initiatives they take and how they get people to participate. That’s one of the challenges we have in Denmark, because there are so many things you can do, so many things where you can be active, so how do you get them to see you? To see you in their daily life and get engaged in this cycling.ISCA: So what do you think are the key elements of a really good initiative that you’ve seen or supported that really gets people active?HLA The main thing is people’s engagement. That if you experience other people being engaged, lively and full of energy, then you get inspired. And then you commit to what they are doing. And you find your role to play with your commitment in some way, no matter whether it’s cycling or social issues, or whatever it is.ISCA: And have you got any final thoughts or messages for the team as they depart on their great journey? HLA: Just keep up the good spirit and use each other’s strong points, which can be both physical and mental. Find out more about the Nordea Foundation The Journey of Hope is co-funded by the European Commission’s Erasmus+ Sport programme and promotes the #BeActive message. Interview by Rachel Payne, ISCA
    ISCA interview with Nordea Foundation director Henrik Lehmann Andersen: "Why we are engaging in sports and cycling"
  • Follow the #JourneyOfHope cycling tour on Flickr
    Relive the start to the colourful #BeActive Journey of Hope cross-border cycling tour – or catch up on what you missed – with our photo gallery from the first four days of the tour in Denmark.From the opening event and departure in Copenhagen on 18 August to the CYKLO cycling festival in Aarhus, the Journey of Hope team has met cycling enthusiasts from east to west of Denmark. A group of cyclists rode from Roskilde to Copenhagen to join them on the first leg of the tour. In Aarhus, they took part in the colourful CYKLO Slow Ride around the city on 20 August and joined the cycling marathon to Vejle for the next leg of the tour on 21 August. Now they are heading south to the Danish-German border on the way to their next Journey of Hope event in Berlin. Waiting for them there is a group of determined women who are using cycling as a way to integrate refugees in one of Europe’s biggest cities. Stay tuned and follow the tour on Flickr, the NowWeMOVE blog, Twitter and Facebook The Journey of Hope is co-funded by the European Commission’s Erasmus+ Sport programme and promotes the #BeActive message.
    Follow the #JourneyOfHope cycling tour on Flickr
  • Danish active transport ambassadors give Journey of Hope a grand send-off
    The #BeActive #JourneyofHope team cycled out of Copenhagen yesterday with over 50 recreational cyclists following them in a nod to Forrest Gump’s famous long-distance run. The official start of the European Week of Sport event, which is carrying messages about active transport, physical activity and peaceful mobility around Europe, marked the beginning of a 31-day, 2530km ride from Copenhagen to Vienna.ISCA member DGI and partner the Danish Cyclists’ Federation ensured that the local cycling community grasped the opportunity to take part in the event and ride with the team to Roskilde, 40km west of Copenhagen. Some followers doubled their journey, riding all the way from Roskilde to Copenhagen, arriving in time to ride back again with the team. DGI tempted passers-by to come and test their speed on its bike simulator and ISCA staff and the Danish child safety awareness foundation “Børneulykkesfonden” entertained the children on Israels Plads with spontaneous dances in the spirit of the #BeActive FlashMOVE, colouring in and biking activities. Børneulykkesfonden ambassador and the City of Copenhagen’s Mayor for Children and Youth Pia Allerslev knows what it takes to complete a long cycling trip – she rode from Copenhagen to Paris twice in support of a cause she believes in. “I think it’s very important to tell people that if you set a goal then you can do it and if you have the energy and the craziness to do things then it’s perfect. And sending the signal that you can bike that many kilometres in 30 days, that’s a wonderful story to tell,” she says. “As the Mayor for Children and Youth in the City of Copenhagen I think it’s important to tell the kids, and also the parents, that when you live in cities it’s very easy to go by bike instead of walking or taking the bus or car.” The Director of the Nordea Foundation, Henrik Lehmann Andersen, was also at Israels Plads to greet the team and is no stranger to long bike rides either, having cycled around Tasmania in Australia for instance. He says events like the Journey of Hope are a great way of showing that anyone can do the same thing if they have a bike, a good spirit and are ready for an adventure. “[Cycling] is not just for specialists or extremely fit Olympic Games-looking people, it’s for everybody. That’s the main perspective and that’s why we are engaging ourselves, as a Danish foundation, in sports and in cycling. It’s not for the elite; it’s for everybody. So to get everybody to do it, to get everybody committed and to get everybody to learn how to do it, that’s the really important thing for us,” he says. The Journey of Hope opening event took place right on the Danish Cyclists’ Federation’s doorstep, and its Director, Klaus Bondam, who is a member of the new World Cycling Alliance created by ISCA partner the European Cyclists’ Federation, praised events like the Journey of Hope that draw attention to active transport as a solution to sedentary lifestyle. “I think every event that moves around promoting active mobility, is very, very important because it is one of the challenges in our society is facing these years: How do we, as human beings, become more active at a time where more and more of us are sitting down at computers? That activity can be recreational cycling, going on longer trips as we see here,” he says. The Danish Cyclists’ Federation’s Bike to Work campaign has seen continued success in a country that already has a strong cycling culture, but where people still use the car for 30% of trips spanning over 5km or less. So he still believes there is “enormous” potential to promote cycling to people anywhere in the world. “We see that cycling can contribute to 11 out of the 17 United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals. For example creating resilient cities and helping to reduce poverty by creating affordable modes of transportation.” Not to mention to the average citizen in Denmark, where physical activity crazes like running are not always for everyone. “The good thing about cycling is that it’s basically for everybody,” he points out. “I’m not a good runner because it makes my knees hurt. But when I’m on the bicycle, I think ‘Whoa – I can do it!’” By Rachel Payne, ISCA The Journey of Hope is co-funded by the European Commission’s Erasmus+ Sport programme and promotes the #BeActive message.
    Danish active transport ambassadors give Journey of Hope a grand send-off
  • European School Sport Day website now live! Registration open
    We are happy to announce that the European School Sport Day website is now live and registration is open! The second European School Sport Day will take place on 30 September and any school in Europe can register to join in and promote innovative approaches to physical education and school sport. ISCA member the Hungarian School Sport Federation and its partners, including ISCA, are coordinating the pan-European event after a successful roll-out from Hungary to Bulgaria and Poland in 2015. European School Sport Day is an official European Week of Sport event supported by the EU. Visit the new website to find out more and register
    European School Sport Day website now live! Registration open
  • The Lancet 2016 report: Do we need more research, surveillance and plans? Comment by ISCA President Mogens Kirkeby
    Photo: ISCA and the NowWeMOVE campaign are moving people with opportunities for action (courtesy Ollerup Academy of PE).  If you get tired of watching the Olympic Games this week, why not read the new Lancet report on physical activity? But remember to move while reading it – the study recommends that if you sit for eight hours on a chair daily, you need one hour of physical activity to balance out the risk. Four years ago, The Lancet launched its first series of articles on physical inactivity, calling it a PANDEMIC. That created some fuss, particularly as it was released just before the London Olympic Games, which promised to “inspire a generation” and “transform a nation” of increasingly sedentary inhabitants through the Games’ legacy. Dropping participation rates in the UK after the Games suggested that this ambition to transform and inspire through an elite sport spectacle had not exactly “transpired”. But what about the rest of the world? Have there been any improvements over the last four years? Again prior to the Olympics, in Rio in 2016, The Lancet published a new series of studies and comments on physical activity. And once again, the authors showed that the global trend of physical inactivity still has all the characteristics of a pandemic. And what’s worse is that in many cases, as its Update on the global pandemic of inactivity points out, “knowledge has not yet been translated into action”. “Progress on physical activity has been far from proportionate to the documented burden of disease from physical inactivity in countries of all income levels,” the authors, Lars Bo Andersen, Jorge Mota and Loretta di Pietro conclude. “The most progress might have been made in putting physical activity on the health agenda of LMICs [low and middle income countries]. LMICs are laying the groundwork for effective public health action on physical activity, but it is not clear where the resources will be found to scale up effective interventions, build a physical activity workforce in public health, expand research in LMICs, and take bold initiatives to alter policies that will increase physical activity in all countries.” We have more knowledge, more surveillance, more policy and plans – BUT less physical activity in today’s world. My response to this is do we need more research, surveillance and plans? NO we need action!! That action can only come from the bottom-up, through more effective grassroots sport and physical activity initiatives. ISCA is still working to create opportunities for the people who are MOVING PEOPLE to exchange their experiences, work together, scale up their initiatives (MOVE Transfer, for example), promote themselves and be active in campaigning for more physical activity. This type of action has the power to “transform” more than any single sporting event can dream about. Read The Lancet’s 2016 report hereFind out more about ISCA’s NowWeMOVE campaign and grasp an opportunity for action 
    The Lancet 2016 report: Do we need more research, surveillance and plans? Comment by ISCA President Mogens Kirkeby
ISCA interview with Nordea Foundation director Henrik Lehmann Andersen: "Why we are engaging in sports and cycling"
Nordea Foundation Director Henrik Lehmann Andersen at the Journey of Hope opening event in Copenhagen. Photo: Nordea Foundation "Cycling is a perfect way to get more people moving. That's why the Nordea Foundation supports cycling playgrounds (cykellegebaner) and the 'On Bike with DGI' (På Cykel med DGI) project," the Danish Nordea Foundation wrote on Twitter on the opening day of the Journey of Hope event. Its Director, Henrik Lehmann Andersen, joined the celebration on 18 August and told ISCA why his foundation is getting behind this accessible mode of transport, why a cycling-friendly nation like Denmark can still learn from other countries, and what attracts him to an initiative. ISCA: What do you think are the messages that come out of an event like this, a Journey of Hope of long distance cycling by recreational cyclists? HLA: The message is that it’s for everybody. It’s not for specialists or extremely fit, Olympic Games-looking people, it’s for everybody. So that’s the main perspective and that’s why we are engaging ourselves, as a Danish foundation, in sports and in cycling. It’s not for the elite; it’s for everybody. So to get everybody to do it, to get everybody committed and to get everybody to learn how to do it, that’s the really important thing for us. ISCA: Do you think that’s also an important thing for active transport and promoting that around Europe as well?HLA: Of course there is a perspective in this thing on cycling across borders to connect people and to get people to know each other across borders and across cultures. That’s a really important thing too. But that’s not the issue of the foundation I work for.ISCA: Denmark in that sense has a lot to contribute in inspiring other countries. What do you think Denmark can get back from the other countries as inspiration in this kind of area? HLA: I think there is a lot of inspiration to catch up on from other countries, in fact every country. Sometimes you think you’re the centre of everything and that everybody else should learn from you, but there are always a lot of things you can learn from others. In this field, there’s a lot to learn from having a broader perspective on cycling – on how a lot of different communities work, on the initiatives they take and how they get people to participate. That’s one of the challenges we have in Denmark, because there are so many things you can do, so many things where you can be active, so how do you get them to see you? To see you in their daily life and get engaged in this cycling.ISCA: So what do you think are the key elements of a really good initiative that you’ve seen or supported that really gets people active?HLA The main thing is people’s engagement. That if you experience other people being engaged, lively and full of energy, then you get inspired. And then you commit to what they are doing. And you find your role to play with your commitment in some way, no matter whether it’s cycling or social issues, or whatever it is.ISCA: And have you got any final thoughts or messages for the team as they depart on their great journey? HLA: Just keep up the good spirit and use each other’s strong points, which can be both physical and mental. Find out more about the Nordea Foundation The Journey of Hope is co-funded by the European Commission’s Erasmus+ Sport programme and promotes the #BeActive message. Interview by Rachel Payne, ISCA

You will like working with us!

Read more »
 

Navigate through the ISCA Youth portal

Read more »
 

The best way to look back at the grassroots sport sector

Read more »
 
 

The 5th edition of NowWeMOVE’s signature event MOVE Week took place in the spring in Europe for the first time this year (23-29 May 2016). MOVE Week in Latin America will be in November (19-27 November in Brazil, Semana Move Brasil).

Read more »

The MOVE Congress will not be held in 2016. Stay tuned for the dates and location of the MOVE Congress 2017. What is the MOVE Congress? See the highlights from the 2015 edition.

Read more »

MOVE Quality aims to identify initiatives which inspire more people to be physically active, build the capacity of the organisations delivering them and reward their achievements with a certificate.

Read more »

ISCA has created MOVE Transfer as a process of identifying physical activity initiatives for hard-to-reach populations that have run successfully in one setting and transferring them to a new setting (new organisation, new community).

Read more »

Good Governance in Grassroots Sport Self Assessment Tool: an interactive online tool providing a range of information and templates across three themes of governance and four principles. Start your self-assessment now!

Read more »

OTHER ISCA ACTIVITIES

Inactivity Time Bomb

In 2015, ISCA commissioned a study called the 'Economic Cost of Physical Inactivity in Europe', showing that half a million Europeans die every year as a result of being physically inactive. The most common causes of death are from those diseases linked to being physically inactive, such as coronary heart disease, type II diabetes and colorectal and breast cancer. One in four adults across Europe is currently physically inactive – as are four out of five adolescents.

 

Download the full report and infographics at the official microsite http://inactivity-time-bomb.nowwemove.com/

Read more »

MOVE&Learn

Training on-line tool for non-formal Education through Sport and physical activities with young people.

Read more »