ISCA Secretariat: Vester Voldgade 100, 2, DK-1552 Copenhagen, Denmark - CVR 29 50 05 41 Tel: +45 29 48 55 51 / info@isca-web.org
  • ISCA staff embark on a “pilgrimage” back to our organisation’s “grassroots” at DGI Landdstævne
    Photo: DGI.  ISCA staff are getting out of the office this week and going back to our organisation’s roots at the DGI Landsstævne in Aalborg, Denmark (which runs from 29 June-2 July). This international multisport festival is an important “pilgrimage” for us, as the International Sport and Culture Association was “born” out of this event 23 years ago. In June 1994, coinciding with the start of the event in Svendborg, the Danish Gymnastics and Sports Associations (now DGI) held a meeting for management staff from 15 organisations. These ISCA pioneers ISCA gathered at Valdemar’s Castle on the island of Tåsinge and put forward their vision of an inclusive umbrella for sport and culture for all organisations. Their vision would soon become reality. On 10 February 1995, representatives of 28 national sport for all organisations from 23 countries officially established ISCA. The founding meeting took place in Copenhagen, Denmark. It seems fitting that the first formal meeting about the creation of ISCA was connected with the DGI Landsstævne. Held since 1862 and with record numbers of participants in 1994 (41,500) and 1998 (45,000), Landsstævne was a booming example of what ISCA set out to celebrate and promote – the “joyful spirit” of participating in sport and cultural activities together. ISCA’s guiding philosophy was based on these pioneers’ belief in the dynamic strength of cultural diversity, organisational pluralism and their desire to help individual citizens exercise their right to physical activity. It was underpinned by sociologist Henning Eichberg’s notion of a “third way of sports”, which sees mass participation sport not as something competitive, but as an intrinsic part of popular culture and civic movement. A driving force behind the founding members’ first steps towards creating an association was that many grassroots sport organisations found themselves excluded from existing international sport structures, like the single sport federation structure, because of the “one country, one member rule”. The grassroots approach was also neglected by the international federations, whose primary focus was to standardise rules for international competitions. The founding members simply felt that the grassroots sport voice was missing internationally. So did many other organisations when they heard about ISCA. By 1998, 42 members had joined the movement and by the new millennium, ISCA was well on its way to being an umbrella for 100 likeminded organisations.Meet us at LandsstævneWe will be at DGI Landsstævne on Thursday and Friday, and you can meet us at the European Fitness Badge stand. If you are going to the event, you can experience over 400 events in 25 different sports from badminton to unicycling – and gymnastics of course! See the full programme here And planning has already started for DGI Landsstævne in Svendborg in 2021! By Rachel Payne, ISCA  
    ISCA staff embark on a “pilgrimage” back to our organisation’s “grassroots” at DGI Landdstævne
  • Celebrating women in sport and physical activity: New ISCA knowledge platform
    This week we are celebrating Women’s Sport Week, a UK initiative of the charity organisation Women in Sport. This organisation is taking big strides to promote opportunities to engage in sport and physical activity – from participating, to volunteering and working in the sport sector.  We feature many of their good examples on our Women in Sport knowledge platform, which ISCA created as a partner of the Alice Milliat Foundation’s Erasmus+ project European Network for Promotion of Women’s Sports. It is an exciting time for women in sport, with women breaking barriers to compete in sports traditionally associated with men (football codes, cricket, boxing), attracting a new wave of media coverage (particularly in Australia and the UK) and becoming the first women to compete for their countries in Olympic sports such as boxing, ski jumping and even athletics. But there is still a lot of room for awareness-raising and confidence boosting to help women in elite and grassroots sport gain equal footing with their male counterparts. We have gathered 60 examples from more than 12 countries that demonstrate tried-and-tested ways of promoting women’s participation at all levels of sport, particularly at the community level. We selected these examples according to the following criteria: they are innovative initiatives in the community sport sector; they offer knowledge and practical experience organisations can learn from; they can be adapted to new settings; they are proven to be sustainable. Visit the Women in Sport knowledge platform to find out more MEPs Emma McClarkin and Julie Ward also share their thoughts and inspiration with us - check out the story here
    Celebrating women in sport and physical activity: New ISCA knowledge platform
  • Volunteering and inclusion initiatives still crucial in grassroots sport: New data
    A new report has been published by the Social Inclusion and Volunteering in Sports Clubs in Europe project (co-funded by Erasmus+ Sport) on similarities and differences among sports clubs in Europe.The report, Characteristics of European sports clubs. A comparison of the structure, management, voluntary work and social integration among sports clubs across ten European countries, finds that recruiting and retaining members is a key challenge in Western European countries, maintaining facilities is a problem in Central and Southern European countries, volunteering remains vital to clubs in all countries, and there is still a lack of inclusion initiatives across the continent. Data from Belgium, Denmark, England, Germany, Hungary, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Spain, and Switzerland are included in the sport. ISCA President Mogens Kirkeby explains why volunteering in local sport clubs is so important to the sport sector today: "Sport clubs exist all over the world and hopefully they will continue to develop and engage millions of citizens in recreational sport and physical activity or even as volunteer trainers or club leaders. The leaders’ commitment is important to secure accessible, affordable and motivating offer to be physical active close to where we live. The volunteer trainers and leaders are important to assure there is an offer to everyone," he says. "The national culture, traditions and condition for sport clubs are clearly different across the world. Sport clubs and particular voluntary and civil society based clubs have developed under different cultures and conditions. The similarities and differences among sport clubs in Europe have been examined in a study including 35,790 clubs. The study shows a lot of both differences and similarities. But it clearly tells us the massive amount of commitment being delivered within voluntary based sports clubs. That is really MOVING PEOPLE." 
    Volunteering and inclusion initiatives still crucial in grassroots sport: New data
  • European Fitness Badge launched at International Gymnastics Festival in Berlin
    This month, the European Fitness Badge was successfully launched at the International German Gymnastics Festival (Internationales Deutsches Turnfest) in Berlin. Over the 6-day festival, the project’s lead, the German Gymnastics Federation (DTB), together with the project partners, including ISCA, tested more than 500 participants of different ages and fitness levels using the Badge’s Basic, Advanced and Approved fitness tests.Former ISCA volunteer Maria Lourdes Gonzalez, who is now working for DTB, tells us what the public’s reaction was to the first test of the European Fitness Badge. Meanwhile, ISCA is looking forward to “Catching the Badge” at the DGI Landsstævne in Aalborg this month! Thanks to the great work of Katja Klemm and her group of volunteer trainers, each participant who met us during Turnfest received their certificate together with some good counselling and an explanation on how to improve their fitness level. For us, this was a good opportunity to see how participants perceived the test and how much attraction it generates. Positive results! Turnfest was also the possibility to catch up with some partners, see the implementation of the badge in action and use the setting for promotional videos that will be ready within the project’s time frame. But we also know that some of our partners have been implementing the test in their organisations, like Ubae in Spain. We filmed some new promotional videos in Berlin, but our project partner DGI has already done a great job to produce this video run-through of how to use the European Fitness Badge. Updates will be made on the official European Fitness Badge website as we receive information from the events where they are used, so please let us know if you are holding European Fitness Badge events. Instructors can access all the information they need to carry out the tests on the website. By Maria Lourdes Gonzalez, Deutscher Turner-Bund Assistant
    European Fitness Badge launched at International Gymnastics Festival in Berlin
  • ISCA coordinates European Week of Sport in Denmark for second year in a row: Event registration now open
    ISCA has again been selected by the Danish Ministry of Culture and the EU to coordinate European Week of Sport activities in Denmark in 2017. The European Week of Sport (EWoS) in Denmark will coincide with the official dates of the European Week of Sport, 23-30 September 2017. It is now possible to register an event on the EWoS Denmark website. Last year’s successful #BeActive campaign included the Copenhagen Half Marathon, a motorway fun run, activities for seniors and street soccer finals. This year will feature two flagship events, among many others across the country. The first flagship event, #BeActive Day of Team Sports and Health, will be a series of pop-up “try-it” ball game activities on 23 September. It is being organised by the Copenhagen Centre for Team Sport and Health at the University of Copenhagen, along with partners DGI and the Sports Confederation of Denmark (DIF) in support for their Move for Life (Bevæg Dig for Livet) campaign. The second flagship event is the second edition of the Marguerit Run on 24 September, organised by the Danish Athletics Federation and DGI together with the Danish media company and publisher of the daily newspaper Politiken. Other events on this year’s Danish EWoS calendar include DGI’s Happy Moves street sport training sessions in seven Danish cities, spontaneous community physical activity events organised by the Ollerup Academy of Physical Education, #BeActive Walks organised by the Danish Ramblers’ Association, several GoRun weekend training sessions, Bike&Run events by the Danish Federation of Company Sports and local club events in Aarhus, the EU Capital of Culture. Anyone can register an event on the official European Week of Sport Denmark webpage http://europeanweekofsport.dk/ You can also find regular event updates on the website's News page and on Twitter http://twitter.com/ewos_dk?lang=en 
    ISCA coordinates European Week of Sport in Denmark for second year in a row: Event registration now open
ISCA staff embark on a “pilgrimage” back to our organisation’s “grassroots” at DGI Landdstævne
Photo: DGI.  ISCA staff are getting out of the office this week and going back to our organisation’s roots at the DGI Landsstævne in Aalborg, Denmark (which runs from 29 June-2 July). This international multisport festival is an important “pilgrimage” for us, as the International Sport and Culture Association was “born” out of this event 23 years ago. In June 1994, coinciding with the start of the event in Svendborg, the Danish Gymnastics and Sports Associations (now DGI) held a meeting for management staff from 15 organisations. These ISCA pioneers ISCA gathered at Valdemar’s Castle on the island of Tåsinge and put forward their vision of an inclusive umbrella for sport and culture for all organisations. Their vision would soon become reality. On 10 February 1995, representatives of 28 national sport for all organisations from 23 countries officially established ISCA. The founding meeting took place in Copenhagen, Denmark. It seems fitting that the first formal meeting about the creation of ISCA was connected with the DGI Landsstævne. Held since 1862 and with record numbers of participants in 1994 (41,500) and 1998 (45,000), Landsstævne was a booming example of what ISCA set out to celebrate and promote – the “joyful spirit” of participating in sport and cultural activities together. ISCA’s guiding philosophy was based on these pioneers’ belief in the dynamic strength of cultural diversity, organisational pluralism and their desire to help individual citizens exercise their right to physical activity. It was underpinned by sociologist Henning Eichberg’s notion of a “third way of sports”, which sees mass participation sport not as something competitive, but as an intrinsic part of popular culture and civic movement. A driving force behind the founding members’ first steps towards creating an association was that many grassroots sport organisations found themselves excluded from existing international sport structures, like the single sport federation structure, because of the “one country, one member rule”. The grassroots approach was also neglected by the international federations, whose primary focus was to standardise rules for international competitions. The founding members simply felt that the grassroots sport voice was missing internationally. So did many other organisations when they heard about ISCA. By 1998, 42 members had joined the movement and by the new millennium, ISCA was well on its way to being an umbrella for 100 likeminded organisations.Meet us at LandsstævneWe will be at DGI Landsstævne on Thursday and Friday, and you can meet us at the European Fitness Badge stand. If you are going to the event, you can experience over 400 events in 25 different sports from badminton to unicycling – and gymnastics of course! See the full programme here And planning has already started for DGI Landsstævne in Svendborg in 2021! By Rachel Payne, ISCA  

You will like working with us!

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Navigate through the ISCA Youth portal

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The best way to look back at the grassroots sport sector

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The 6th European edition of NowWeMOVE’s signature event MOVE Week was on 29 May-4 June 2017. Stay tuned for the dates for 2018. and MOVE Week in Latin America (Semana Muévela and Semana MOVE Brasil) will take place from 23-29 September 2017.

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The MOVE Congress 2017 will be held in Birmingham, UK, from 4-6 October. Registration is now open and the theme is the Human Right to MOVE. Visit the official MOVE Congress website for more information.

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Good Governance in Grassroots Sport Self Assessment Tool: an interactive online tool providing a range of information and templates across three themes of governance and four principles. Start your self-assessment now!

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OTHER ISCA ACTIVITIES

Inactivity Time Bomb

In 2015, ISCA commissioned a study called the 'Economic Cost of Physical Inactivity in Europe', showing that half a million Europeans die every year as a result of being physically inactive. The most common causes of death are from those diseases linked to being physically inactive, such as coronary heart disease, type II diabetes and colorectal and breast cancer. One in four adults across Europe is currently physically inactive – as are four out of five adolescents.

 

Download the full report and infographics at the official microsite http://inactivity-time-bomb.nowwemove.com/

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MOVE&Learn

Training on-line tool for non-formal Education through Sport and physical activities with young people.

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