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  • “There is nothing more powerful than sharing ideas, stories and knowledge”: Erasmus+ project partners raise their voice at Moving Europe conference
    ISCA and the partners of four Erasmus+ Sport projects (ActiveVoice, PASS Project, FlashMOVE and Journey of Hope) gathered in Ljubljana, Slovenia, this week for a special conference dedicated to their collective efforts to promote and advocate for physical activity over the past year. The occasion was a rare opportunity for grassroots sport organisations, researchers, sector representatives, event organisers and public authorities to debate the future implementation of the EU Health-Enhancing Physical Activity (HEPA) Guidelines and exchange perspectives on the way forward. The one-day conference, Moving Europe – Moving People, was held at the Ljubljana Town Hall and included presentations from the project partners and special guests Florence Mondin from the EU Sport Unit and Andrea Backovic Jurican from the Slovenian National Institute of Public Health and HEPA Europe Network Steering Committee. ISCA President, Mogens Kirkeby, opened the conference by emphasising the need to capitalise on the potential of cross-sector collaboration among those at the event. “We cannot rely on a top-down solution [to physical inactivity],” he said. “Civil society organisations need to play a more significant role in implementing the EU HEPA Guidelines.” Florence Mondin echoed this call for more cooperation in her opening address to the group. “Policy actions alone are not enough to get people off their couch,” she said. “The European Commission can only do so much. Physical inactivity is a complex issue and needs to be solved by a number of actors.” As grassroots sport organisations often do not realise that they have a role and potential power to advocate for changes in policy, the conference’s main theme was to explore what advocacy means in the sport and health sectors and how these organisations can create change locally or internationally by combining their efforts. “We have to join forces and coordinate our actions because we have the same aim,” Sport and Citizenship Vice President Vincent Chaudel said in the conference’s expert panel debate. The panellists, who also included Kirkeby, Backovic Jurican and European Cyclists’ Federation policy officer Randy Rzewnicki, discussed whether an immediate need for the sector was more research or activation – or a combination of both – a topic that Richard Bailey from ICSSPE and the PASS Project extended through his presentation on why evidence-based action was essential in the promotion of physical activity. “If we start becoming complacent [and stop doing research to focus on taking action], then we’re going to have to settle for crumbs off the table when we really deserve much more.” Bridging the gap between research and actionThe PASS and ActiveVoice projects are each trying to bridge the gap between knowledge production, advocacy and action. The former has mapped different studies on physical activity in Europe, collecting data that can be used to build a case for institutional support. The latter is developing a toolkit for national and local organisations to use as a guide to what they can achieve and how they can approach other stakeholders to influence decision-making or enter into partnerships. “The ActiveVoice project is about helping NGOs raise their game,” ECF’s Randy Rzewnicki pointed out. “What are the best ways to get your message out? What are the most effective ways of doing advocacy?” The project partners remained in Ljubljana for three-four days to evaluate their projects’ progress and exchange perspectives across the different project topics. Both the conference and the FlashMOVE meetings scattered active breaks among the sessions with the Sports Union of Slovenia and SportMalta performing the 2016 FlashMOVE (official opening flash mob for the European Week of Sport) choreography with all of the participants. ISCA Head of Projects Saska Benedicic Tomat said she was happy to see these diverse partners mix in a way they would not normally get the opportunity to in their everyday work. “We are proud to have been able to bring together partners of four projects – 50 participants from 20 different countries and from 30 different organisations,” she said. “The conference and meetings brought us the unique opportunity to interact with the people who have dedicated their professional lives to the development and promotion of physical activity, and to facilitate dialogue between European and national stakeholders with the purpose of increasing the advocacy capacity of civil society organisations involved in HEPA promotion. There is nothing more powerful than sharing ideas, stories, and knowledge.” By Rachel PaynePhotos by Flare Visuals, Slovenia The ActiveVoice, PASS, FlashMOVE and Journey of Hope projects have been funded with support from the European Commission under Erasmus+ Sport Collaborative Partnerships of Events Supporting the #BeActive European Week of Sport.
    “There is nothing more powerful than sharing ideas, stories and knowledge”: Erasmus+ project partners raise their voice at Moving Europe conference
  • Physical activity sector: England needs your help
    ISCA partner ukactive’s National Summit in London on 9 November sent a clear message to the physical activity sector: the nation’s public sport and health bodies need your help.Sport England and NHS England’s (the national health service) leaders stressed the need to bridge the gap between research, policy, promotion and – ultimately – the impact they want to see among the public. And they realised that to meet this target they have to find a way to reach the grassroots. Increasing physical activity levels in the UK is an agenda that gained momentum in connection with the government’s ambitions to fulfil legacy promises from the London Olympic Games. The government has indeed made big strides towards “tackling inactivity”, which is what Sport England aims to do with £250 million of funding over the next four years. Who are the “inactive” and how do we reach them?Ukactive's Chair, Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson, wrote prior to the summit that inactivity is costing the UK up to £20 billion per year and is an underlying factor of 20 major physical conditions. At the summit she even described inactivity as “a source of national embarrassment” despite top-down efforts to reverse the trend. But the “inactive” are a tricky bunch to grasp, Sport England’s CEO Jennie Price admitted. She divided the 29% of inactive English adults into three groups ranging from the completely sedentary to those who are not reaching the intensity of activity that can significantly benefit their health (see photo). Efforts often focus on the crucial transition from inactive to some activity, but Price also mentioned those who stop doing regular vigorous physical activity as a particularly elusive group. “If you ask most people, at some point they have has a serious engagement with physical activity but have stopped because of life circumstances… It’s so hard to grasp this section,” she said. Sport England’s Director of Community Sport, Mike Diaper, used the renowned awareness campaign This Girl Can as an example of an effort that has succeeded in awareness-raising, but has encountered barriers with its target group being put off by lack of support when they try to put their inspiration into practice. “I think we’ve got to be better at strengthening the part underneath,” he said, referring to developing the skills and behaviour of staff in health and physical activity centres, from doctors to receptionists who he describes as “the gateway to change”. All guns blazing approach to finding customer-centric solutionsSport England wants to reach a broad spectrum of inactive citizens at once, from youth to the elderly, girls and women, people with disabilities and ethnic minorities. But at the moment, Diaper says, the sport sector is still best at “catering for younger, fitter and more active people”. From now to March the government body is unravelling a series of “customer-centric” initiatives and resources, including a Tackling Inactivity Insight Pack, 3-4 local delivery pilots (out of 10 proposed in total), the next phase of This Girl Can and a host of investments to all of the target groups it is trying to reach. With all guns blazing, it is in talks with organisations across sectors, from the physical activity sector to pension funds, to find its way to society’s elusive inactive members. NHS England’s CEO Simon Stevens listed physical activity as second on its agenda, after food and beverages, as vital area for initiating change. He also listed a wide range of stakeholders the national health service wants to work, encouraging local authorities, for example, to “proactively seek out your hospital and ambulance service to find out how you can advance this [physical activity] agenda”.Great ambitions = great opportunitiesWith Sport England “desperately” (according to Jennie Price) wanting to work with the physical activity sector and NHS England grappling for links with the same sector, which ukactive’s Tanni Grey-Thompson believes will help “save it from bankruptcy”, grassroots sport and physical activity organisations in the UK are in a prime position to pounce on new funding and opportunities being made available. This urgency for cross-sector collaboration could also help create “a radical shift towards prevention over cure”, Grey-Thompson says, and she also sees it as an important opportunity for ukactive (and other active leisure organisations) to advocate for further state funding, including recommending “the [UK] government’s Industrial Strategy to lead a £1billion regeneration scheme to transform the UK’s ageing fleet of leisure centres into new community wellness hubs”. Whichever way these ambitions and opportunities unfold over the following years, England will be a country to watch as it aims to leave its mark on its citizens and the physical activity space with the broadest brush it can find in its paintbox. By Rachel Payne, ISCA 
    Physical activity sector: England needs your help
  • Save the dates for No Elevators Day and MOVE Week in 2017
    Two of the NowWeMOVE campaign's hallmark European events, No Elevators Day and MOVE Week, are confirmed to take place once again in the Northern Hemisphere's spring in 2017. No Elevators Day will be held on the last Wednesday in April, which is 26 April in 2017. This event follows on from two previous editions which engaged companies, politicians and individuals wanting to promote an easy way to fit physical activity into their colleagues' working day. The catch phrase #NowWeTakeTheStairs gained momentum on social media as the participants shared their activities on the day. After a successful move to May this year, MOVE Week will now have a regular starting date in the last week of May from 2017 onward. This means that MOVE Week will take place from Monday 29 May-Sunday 4 June in 2017. This year, the NowWeMOVE campaign's flagship week offered over 2000 free grassroots sport and physical activity events across Europe, thanks to the determination of the campaign's National Coordinators and MOVE Agents to guarantee a successful transition from autumn to spring. ISCA will soon release a call for MOVE Agents for both No Elevators Day and MOVE Week and provide resources and ideas to help interested organisations and individuals organise their events. In the meantime, please visit the official No Elevators Day and MOVE Week webpages to find out more and imagine how you will MOVE your communities next April or May.
    Save the dates for No Elevators Day and MOVE Week in 2017
  • International Gymnastics for All forum "exceeded our expectations": SESC São Paulo
    The VIII International Forum of Gymnastics for All was held from 13-16 of October 2016 at Unicamp and Sesc Campinas in Brazil with support from ISCA. The programme's theme, "Connecting the differences”, was the link between the forum's various session, including an opening conference, round table discussion, "presentation of scientific works", courses, festivals, parallel meetings and a book launch. A total of 407 participants took part, including international experts from Germany, England, USA and Portugal, who led practical courses and lectures, as well as gymnastics groups from Argentina, Germany, Chile, USA and Portugal, who provided the entertainment at the festivals. "In general, I can say that the audience enjoyed the Forum and that the result exceeded our expectations," ISCA Vice President and Manager of Physical and Sportive Development at Sesc São Paulo, Maria Luiza Souza Dias says. "The four nights of festival was an important moment of exchanges and integration among the 1200 gymnasts and 58 groups participating." The International Forum of Gymnastics for All is held every two years and is a colourful event on the Brazilian sport for all calendar. The event has evolved from the Brazilian Forum on General Gymnastics.  
    International Gymnastics for All forum "exceeded our expectations": SESC São Paulo
  • Integration of Refugees Through Sport project moves from theory to practice
    This year, ISCA, with funding from the Nordplus and Erasmus+ programme, has started working with a sensitive topic and vulnerable target group that has been the subject of great debate in Europe this decade. The first project, Integration of Refugees Through Sport (IRTS), has brought together partners from the Nordic countries to map and explore ways of integrating refugees into European societies through sport and physical activity. The IRTS project, funded by Nordplus Adult, began in August with a kick off meeting in Olso, Norway, hosted by partner Akershus Idrettskrets. The partner consortium also includes the Icelandic Youth Association UMFÍ (Iceland), Academy of Physical Education Ollerup (Denmark), SISU Västergötland (Sweden) and ISCA as the project lead.Since then, the project has been moving forward, carrying out an overview of good practices in refugee integration through sport within the Nordic countries and beyond and drafting a “Principles and Guidelines Manual” sharing ideas on how to implement effective initiatives. Indeed, the action has not only happened at a theoretical level. It has also moved into the field, with the partners seeing examples of initiatives in action. From 17-21 October, international students from the Ollerup Academy, led by Cristiane Fiorin Fuglsang, delivered physical activity games at Nyborg Asylum Centre for families and Ollerup Asylum School for unaccompanied young men. ISCA joined the group in a participant observation role, helping the students deliver the activities, observing their development and seeing first-hand what will eventually be documented on paper. With a variety of games, sports and activities offered to all children and adults at the centre, the activities were an all-round success. They were also an encouraging glimpse into the humanitarian work that our sector can do with an impact that is immediately noticeable in the smiles, laughs and hugs exchanged between the participants. “We arrived there [at the centres] without knowing for certain what these kids are feeling in their hearts, through which experiences they have suffered to get here, or what their dreams are for the future. But we do know how we can contribute. Giving smiles, hugs and integrating them, using physical activity to break paradigms. That is the real meaning for me.” These were the words of Adeline, a Brazilian international student at Ollerup who led many activities and gave all her energy to help, at least for a few days, the refugees forget the situation in which they are living today.A similar activity will take place during November in Sweden, with ISCA taking part in actions led by the SISU Västergötland’s “Sports for you” programme and holding a workshop with the volunteers involved in implementing it. The IRTS project will keep moving forward, developing guidelines and principles that can be extended to a broader number of organisations and institutions involved in or willing to work with IRTS, and also in practice, in the field, doing what needs and can be done by the grassroots sport sector. Read more on the NowWeMOVE blog including a story from Ollerup student Javier Mira about his first experience working with refugees Article and photos by Maria Lourdes Gonzalez, ISCA
    Integration of Refugees Through Sport project moves from theory to practice
“There is nothing more powerful than sharing ideas, stories and knowledge”: Erasmus+ project partners raise their voice at Moving Europe conference
ISCA and the partners of four Erasmus+ Sport projects (ActiveVoice, PASS Project, FlashMOVE and Journey of Hope) gathered in Ljubljana, Slovenia, this week for a special conference dedicated to their collective efforts to promote and advocate for physical activity over the past year. The occasion was a rare opportunity for grassroots sport organisations, researchers, sector representatives, event organisers and public authorities to debate the future implementation of the EU Health-Enhancing Physical Activity (HEPA) Guidelines and exchange perspectives on the way forward. The one-day conference, Moving Europe – Moving People, was held at the Ljubljana Town Hall and included presentations from the project partners and special guests Florence Mondin from the EU Sport Unit and Andrea Backovic Jurican from the Slovenian National Institute of Public Health and HEPA Europe Network Steering Committee. ISCA President, Mogens Kirkeby, opened the conference by emphasising the need to capitalise on the potential of cross-sector collaboration among those at the event. “We cannot rely on a top-down solution [to physical inactivity],” he said. “Civil society organisations need to play a more significant role in implementing the EU HEPA Guidelines.” Florence Mondin echoed this call for more cooperation in her opening address to the group. “Policy actions alone are not enough to get people off their couch,” she said. “The European Commission can only do so much. Physical inactivity is a complex issue and needs to be solved by a number of actors.” As grassroots sport organisations often do not realise that they have a role and potential power to advocate for changes in policy, the conference’s main theme was to explore what advocacy means in the sport and health sectors and how these organisations can create change locally or internationally by combining their efforts. “We have to join forces and coordinate our actions because we have the same aim,” Sport and Citizenship Vice President Vincent Chaudel said in the conference’s expert panel debate. The panellists, who also included Kirkeby, Backovic Jurican and European Cyclists’ Federation policy officer Randy Rzewnicki, discussed whether an immediate need for the sector was more research or activation – or a combination of both – a topic that Richard Bailey from ICSSPE and the PASS Project extended through his presentation on why evidence-based action was essential in the promotion of physical activity. “If we start becoming complacent [and stop doing research to focus on taking action], then we’re going to have to settle for crumbs off the table when we really deserve much more.” Bridging the gap between research and actionThe PASS and ActiveVoice projects are each trying to bridge the gap between knowledge production, advocacy and action. The former has mapped different studies on physical activity in Europe, collecting data that can be used to build a case for institutional support. The latter is developing a toolkit for national and local organisations to use as a guide to what they can achieve and how they can approach other stakeholders to influence decision-making or enter into partnerships. “The ActiveVoice project is about helping NGOs raise their game,” ECF’s Randy Rzewnicki pointed out. “What are the best ways to get your message out? What are the most effective ways of doing advocacy?” The project partners remained in Ljubljana for three-four days to evaluate their projects’ progress and exchange perspectives across the different project topics. Both the conference and the FlashMOVE meetings scattered active breaks among the sessions with the Sports Union of Slovenia and SportMalta performing the 2016 FlashMOVE (official opening flash mob for the European Week of Sport) choreography with all of the participants. ISCA Head of Projects Saska Benedicic Tomat said she was happy to see these diverse partners mix in a way they would not normally get the opportunity to in their everyday work. “We are proud to have been able to bring together partners of four projects – 50 participants from 20 different countries and from 30 different organisations,” she said. “The conference and meetings brought us the unique opportunity to interact with the people who have dedicated their professional lives to the development and promotion of physical activity, and to facilitate dialogue between European and national stakeholders with the purpose of increasing the advocacy capacity of civil society organisations involved in HEPA promotion. There is nothing more powerful than sharing ideas, stories, and knowledge.” By Rachel PaynePhotos by Flare Visuals, Slovenia The ActiveVoice, PASS, FlashMOVE and Journey of Hope projects have been funded with support from the European Commission under Erasmus+ Sport Collaborative Partnerships of Events Supporting the #BeActive European Week of Sport.

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Navigate through the ISCA Youth portal

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The best way to look back at the grassroots sport sector

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The 5th edition of NowWeMOVE’s signature event MOVE Week took place in the spring in Europe for the first time this year (23-29 May 2016). MOVE Week in Latin America will be in November (19-27 November in Brazil, Semana Move Brasil).

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The MOVE Congress will not be held in 2016. Stay tuned for the dates and location of the MOVE Congress 2017. What is the MOVE Congress? See the highlights from the 2015 edition.

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MOVE Quality aims to identify initiatives which inspire more people to be physically active, build the capacity of the organisations delivering them and reward their achievements with a certificate.

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ISCA has created MOVE Transfer as a process of identifying physical activity initiatives for hard-to-reach populations that have run successfully in one setting and transferring them to a new setting (new organisation, new community).

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Good Governance in Grassroots Sport Self Assessment Tool: an interactive online tool providing a range of information and templates across three themes of governance and four principles. Start your self-assessment now!

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OTHER ISCA ACTIVITIES

Inactivity Time Bomb

In 2015, ISCA commissioned a study called the 'Economic Cost of Physical Inactivity in Europe', showing that half a million Europeans die every year as a result of being physically inactive. The most common causes of death are from those diseases linked to being physically inactive, such as coronary heart disease, type II diabetes and colorectal and breast cancer. One in four adults across Europe is currently physically inactive – as are four out of five adolescents.

 

Download the full report and infographics at the official microsite http://inactivity-time-bomb.nowwemove.com/

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MOVE&Learn

Training on-line tool for non-formal Education through Sport and physical activities with young people.

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