ISCA Secretariat: Vester Voldgade 100, 2, DK-1552 Copenhagen, Denmark - CVR 29 50 05 41 Tel: +45 29 48 55 51 / info@isca-web.org
  • Grassroots Sport Diplomacy project features in new Sport and Citizenship journal
    The latest Sport and Citizenship journal features ISCA's new project, Grassroots Sport Diplomacy, which was launched in February. The story is published in both French and English. The project is exploring this overlooked aspect of sports and cultural diplomacy, and the partners are now mapping grassroots sport diplomacy actions from around the world in theory and in practice. This will include consultations with organisations who are engaging in these actions and culminate in a clearing house to share information and encourage networking on the topic. The think tank Sport and Citizenship is a partner in the project, which includes two other French expert institutions, European Observatory of Sport and Employment (EOSE) (the President of EOSE, Prof. Thierry Zintz, is a member of the EU High Level Group on Sports Diplomacy), and the French Institute for International and Strategic Studies (IRIS), three sport oriented bodies, National Olympic Committee and Sport Confederation of Denmark, UBAE from Spain and UISP from Italy, two governmental institutions, the National School, University and Leisure Sport Federation in Hungary and the Portuguese Institute for Sport and Youth, and one non-European partner, Social Service of Commerce (SESC) from Brazil. You can download the article below or find the full journal here Read more about Grassroots Sport Diplomacy here
    Grassroots Sport Diplomacy project features in new Sport and Citizenship journal
  • “It’s not every day you see a giant orange Triangle Man three metres in the air!” ISCA mascot a hit at Runners High in Denmark
    After months of hostile Copenhagen weather, the sun broke through the clouds and lit up Zealand yesterday just in time for the Runners High at Bispebjerg Hospital. The event involved around 300 runners of varying levels and ages running a 6km route that also included a gruelling ascent up 120 steps to the top of the 24m high, seven floor, hospital car park. ISCA attended the event in co-operation with our member, DGI, who are integral to organising the Runners High series of races. The team arrived early and set up our stand to increase awareness of No Elevators Day, which will take place on Wednesday 25 April. A race where stair climbing is the primary objective seemed the perfect fit for the promotion of an event where the intention is to get more people to use the stairs! Before the race began, we handed out flyers and wristbands, and many intrigued Runners High participants came and stopped by the stall to find out just what No Elevators Day entails. Given the nature of the people at the event it was no wonder that many people were enthusiastic and interested in getting involved next week! Then came ISCA’s main attraction for the day - Triangle Man (his friends call him NED) - the real life embodiment of No Elevators Day! He was a hit with everyone, from children to pensioners. Not only did Triangle Man compete in the event, he was also in demand for interviews, selfies, and at one point became the “flyer” for the Foxy Cheerleaders who were attending the event. It is not every day that you see a giant orange Triangle Man three metres in the air! Participants were also encouraged up the stairs by motivational posters promoting No Elevators Day, given the amazing view from the roof of the car park, which was basking in a setting sun as the runners reached the summit. All the effort was 100% worth it. The event was not only a productive one, but enjoyable for everyone involved! Find out more about No Elevators DayBy Alexander Appleyard-Keeling, ISCA
    “It’s not every day you see a giant orange Triangle Man three metres in the air!” ISCA mascot a hit at Runners High in Denmark
  • No Elevators Day reveals simple solution to a complex problem
    For immediate release – Copenhagen, 19 April 2018.  The world is sitting on a physical inactivity time bomb. Who can defuse it? The answer could be right in front of us – and it costs nothing. This week the WHO and politicians from 43 countries called for institutional actions to reduce premature deaths from non-communicable diseases (NCDs) by 33% by 2030. Next week, No Elevators Day on 25 April will highlight that ordinary citizens have the power to take action right now with an easy way to add physical activity to a busy working day. No Elevators Day is part of the International Sport and Culture Association’s (ISCA) NowWeMOVE campaign to get 100 million more Europeans active by 2020. Now the initiative is expanding worldwide and events are set to take place in Asia, Africa and Latin America as well as Europe. Voluntary event organisers will seal off elevators and escalators in office buildings and public spaces to nudge passers-by to take the stairs instead. Physical inactivity is the fourth biggest risk factor for developing life-threatening NCDs and there is growing evidence that physical activity is a simple solution to the complex problem of finding effective interventions. No Elevators Day aims to show busy workers in urban areas who are at a great risk of developing NCDs that opportunities to move every day are free and all around them. Getting 15 minutes of their recommended daily dose of exercise can be as simple as taking the stairs rather than the elevator or escalator throughout the day. ISCA, its partners and members have extended an open invitation for individuals and organisations to join No Elevators Day by voluntarily closing some of the elevators and/or escalators on their premises on 25 April. Those who register online can download promotional stickers and sealing tape to raise awareness for the day. All activities under No Elevators Day title are voluntary and take into consideration the accessibility requirements for people with disabilities and medical conditions. Supporters of No Elevators Day in 2018 will include:20 Members of European Parliament and the Commissioner for Health and Food Safety Vytenis Andriukaitis will do promotional activities with ISCA the Parliament building in Brussels from 24-26 ApriMajor international companies including Amazon in India and ING Bank in BelgiumPublic institutions, NGOs and campaigns such as the Irish Heart Foundation, Vilnius City Municipality in Lithuania, Leon City in Spain, the Ministry of Sport, Youth and Child Development in Lusaka in Zambia, and Active Working Group’s On Your Feet Britain dayUniversities such as Maastricht University in the Netherlands, City of Glasgow College in Scotland, the University of National and World Economy in Bulgaria and UTAR University in Malaysia A list of participating cities and organisations is available at http://no-elevators-day.nowwemove.com/ and https://t.co/ukcoUnmD1D Quote from NowWeMOVE Coordinator for Europe, Laska Nenova:“We started the European No Elevators Day in 2015 to give busy people an easy way to be active and help their colleagues and communities get more active every day. Backed by the success of the first three editions we are now rolling it out globally. The international dimension of No Elevators Day allows us to show that this initiative can be adapted all around the world and we can all step up to defuse the inactivity time bomb.” Find the ISCA/Cebr report on the Economic Costs of Physical Inactivity in Europe (the “inactivity time bomb”) at http://inactivity-time-bomb.nowwemove.com/ Press contactsRachel Payne, ISCA Communications Manager: +45 52 79 45 09 rpa(at)isca-web(dot)orgLaska Nenova, NowWeMOVE Campaign Manager: +359 888 524 158 ln(at)isca-web(dot)org Follow the day on Twitterhttps://twitter.com/isca_tweethttps://twitter.com/NowWeMove#NoElevatorsDay #TakeTheStairs 
    No Elevators Day reveals simple solution to a complex problem
  • One week to go until No Elevators Day!
    We’re counting down to the fourth No Elevators Day, which will take place across the world next Wednesday 25 April. This year, events are being staged for the first time in India, Pakistan, Taiwan, South Korea, Malaysia, Zambia, Brazil, Mexico and Moldova. It’s easy to nudge more people in your office building or public spaces to be active and be part of an international movement promoting healthy lifestyles. 5 easy ways to get involved in No Elevators Day1) Organise your own event and register it on the official webpage http://no-elevators-day.nowwemove.com/register/ 2) Join the Facebook event at http://www.facebook.com/events/325999764572206/ 3) Spread the word by supporting the Thunderclap via Twitter, Facebook or Tumblr https://www.thunderclap.it/projects/68472-no-elevators-day-2018 4) Climb some stairs on the day or close off and elevator or escalator and share your activities with the #NoElevatorsDay hashtag 5) Find an event near you and join in the fun http://no-elevators-day.nowwemove.com/noelevatorsday-events/
    One week to go until No Elevators Day!
  • S2A Sport partners launching a range of innovative products to support workforce development in Europe
    “Improving skills for sport administration in Europe is a crucial process in the development and professionalisation of the whole sport sector, and we should be proud to have pioneered a series of innovative outputs during the S2A-Sport project. The interest from the sector has clearly been demonstrated and we have developed together a solid foundation. The time is now for us all to work on the next steps towards sustainability and future actions!”  It is with this message that the S2A Sport partners, including ISCA, are launching the resources produced during the 30-month EU funded project. The whole project has been carried out based EOSE’s 7 Step Model and acted as a clear call to action to equip those working or volunteering in sport administration with the skills and knowledge that match their diverse roles in the sport sector. The partnership is therefore thrilled to finally present to all stakeholders in the sport sector and beyond a series of innovative and interactive reports on sport administration, which can be read in conjunction with each other or as standalone documents. They include: A Research Report mapping the labour market, trends and perspectives for sport administration in Europe with detailed data and insights which confirm that, in recent years, sport organisations have been operating across a more complex environment that has a demand for highly skilled and adaptable employees.The related Occupational Map for sport administration, which draws on available data on the background, organisations, workforce and key drivers in sport administration to provide a broad frame of reference.The Occupational Descriptor which focuses on the generic job role of sport administrator, identifying the main occupational tasks, activities and responsibilities linked to this role and providing information about continuing professional development, opportunities for promotion and career progression.The Functional Map which builds upon the concept of functional analysis and presents a graphical representation of the main functions that were identified as part of the mapping of the sport administration area.The detailed industry-led Occupational Standards specifying the standards of performance, and defining the precise knowledge and skills sport administrators need to perform effectively.The corresponding Training Programme Handbook which provides initial guidance in respect to the development of education and training opportunities in sport administration (including essential elements to be considered such as learning outcomes, accreditation and using occupational standards in the design of training, assessment, delivery and teaching).The Guide to Quality Assurance and Sustainability discusses quality assurance in several aspects of education as well as the concepts of accreditation and endorsement and explores sustainability strategies including target audience and uses and benefits of the S2A Sport outputs. Based on the S2A Sport pilot European training event organised in Vierumaki, Finland, in September 2017 for 40 emerging sport leaders, we know that the approach developed has tremendous potential to develop reflective practitioners in sport administration, with self-refection skills hence contributing in return to the development of their organisations. “We are really excited about the results of the pilot and are optimistic that the whole set of developed outputs will have a positive impact on sport administration in Europe and the success of sport organisations,” Project Leader Aurélien Favre from EOSE says. Opportunities for sport administrators in Europe to become equipped to turn strategy into action in sport and physical activity start now! Read our series of innovative outputs, share the news with other organisations and sport administrators using #Skills4Sport, #SportAdministrators and feel free to email us at eosesec@eose.org should you want to explore further opportunities to roll out the approach, learn more about the project and outputs or receive a printed copy of the documents. The S2A Sport project was co-funded by the European Commission under the Erasmus+ Collaborative Partnerships in Sport programme.*Full list of partners: European Observatoire of Sport and Employment (France), Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium), National Sport Academy (Bulgaria), International Sport and Culture Association (Denmark), Sport Institute of Finland (Finland), European Federation for Company Sport (EFCS), Universita degli Studi di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale (Italy), Mykolas Romeris University (Lithuania), Tennis Europe (Switzerland), Werkgeversorganisatie in de Sport (The Netherlands), EOSE Services (UK), University of Chester (UK). Visit the official website of the project for more information: http://www.s2a-sport.eu/ 
    S2A Sport partners launching a range of innovative products to support workforce development in Europe
Grassroots Sport Diplomacy project features in new Sport and Citizenship journal
The latest Sport and Citizenship journal features ISCA's new project, Grassroots Sport Diplomacy, which was launched in February. The story is published in both French and English. The project is exploring this overlooked aspect of sports and cultural diplomacy, and the partners are now mapping grassroots sport diplomacy actions from around the world in theory and in practice. This will include consultations with organisations who are engaging in these actions and culminate in a clearing house to share information and encourage networking on the topic. The think tank Sport and Citizenship is a partner in the project, which includes two other French expert institutions, European Observatory of Sport and Employment (EOSE) (the President of EOSE, Prof. Thierry Zintz, is a member of the EU High Level Group on Sports Diplomacy), and the French Institute for International and Strategic Studies (IRIS), three sport oriented bodies, National Olympic Committee and Sport Confederation of Denmark, UBAE from Spain and UISP from Italy, two governmental institutions, the National School, University and Leisure Sport Federation in Hungary and the Portuguese Institute for Sport and Youth, and one non-European partner, Social Service of Commerce (SESC) from Brazil. You can download the article below or find the full journal here Read more about Grassroots Sport Diplomacy here

You will like working with us!

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Navigate through the ISCA Youth portal

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The best way to look back at the grassroots sport sector

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The 7th European edition of NowWeMOVE’s signature event MOVE Week will take place on 28 May-3 June 2018. Stay tuned for the dates of MOVE Week in Latin America (Semana Muévela and Semana MOVE Brasil).

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New ISCA website coming soon! Our mascot is working very hard on a brand new ISCA website and we look forward to revealing it to you later in 2018. Meanwhile, we will still keep you updated here with the latest news from ISCA and our partners.

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OTHER ISCA ACTIVITIES

Inactivity Time Bomb

In 2015, ISCA commissioned a study called the 'Economic Cost of Physical Inactivity in Europe', showing that half a million Europeans die every year as a result of being physically inactive. The most common causes of death are from those diseases linked to being physically inactive, such as coronary heart disease, type II diabetes and colorectal and breast cancer. One in four adults across Europe is currently physically inactive – as are four out of five adolescents.

 

Download the full report and infographics at the official microsite http://inactivity-time-bomb.nowwemove.com/

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MOVE&Learn

Training on-line tool for non-formal Education through Sport and physical activities with young people.

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