ISCA Secretariat: Vester Voldgade 100, 2, DK-1552 Copenhagen, Denmark - CVR 29 50 05 41 Tel: +45 29 48 55 51 / info@isca-web.org
  • 10th anniversary of EU White Paper on Sport a milestone for grassroots sport
    Photo: MEP Sean Kelly gets active outside European Parliament (by Jana Stehlíková).  This week marks the 10th anniversary of one of the most important EU documents for the grassroots sport sector: the EU White Paper on Sport. The White Paper is a policy document adopted in 2007 that recognised the importance of increasing mass participation in sport and physical activity.  Among its focus areas and proposed actions were the  "societal role of sport", "enhancing public health through physical activity" and "sport for social inclusion", and developing physical activity guidelines and offering support to civil society organisations working in grassroots sport. The Preparatory Actions funding stream in the field of sport was set up in 2009 to offer funding for these organisations to carry out projects and events related to the EU's proposed actions, and the initiative continued with the Erasmus+ Sport programme in 2014. ISCA Secretary General Jacob Schouenborg commented on the day that the anniversary "indeed marks a milestone in the clever path of EU Sport to move from merely policing professional sport to promoting grassroots sport". The EU White Paper on Sport is available online here
    10th anniversary of EU White Paper on Sport a milestone for grassroots sport
  • First speakers confirmed for MOVE Congress 2017
    The first ten speakers are now confirmed for the MOVE Congress in Birmingham from 4-6 October 2017, and the line-up includes some of the most influential women in UK sport. Meet Sport England CEO Jennie Price, the FA’s head of women’s football Baroness Sue Campbell and StreetGames CEO Jane Ashworth, who will be keynote speakers in the Congress plenary sessions on active urban spaces, physical activity for hard-to-reach groups and holistic approaches to physical activity in schools. Gil Penalosa, from the successful Canadian initiative 8 80 Cities, is the first confirmed speaker from outside Europe, and more international speakers will be confirmed in the coming weeks. Visit the official MOVE Congress website to see the programme and register by 31 July for an early bird discount. 
    First speakers confirmed for MOVE Congress 2017
  • ISCA staff embark on a “pilgrimage” back to our organisation’s “grassroots” at DGI Landdstævne
    Photo: DGI.  ISCA staff are getting out of the office this week and going back to our organisation’s roots at the DGI Landsstævne in Aalborg, Denmark (which runs from 29 June-2 July). This international multisport festival is an important “pilgrimage” for us, as the International Sport and Culture Association was “born” out of this event 23 years ago. In June 1994, coinciding with the start of the event in Svendborg, the Danish Gymnastics and Sports Associations (now DGI) held a meeting for management staff from 15 organisations. These ISCA pioneers ISCA gathered at Valdemar’s Castle on the island of Tåsinge and put forward their vision of an inclusive umbrella for sport and culture for all organisations. Their vision would soon become reality. On 10 February 1995, representatives of 28 national sport for all organisations from 23 countries officially established ISCA. The founding meeting took place in Copenhagen, Denmark. It seems fitting that the first formal meeting about the creation of ISCA was connected with the DGI Landsstævne. Held since 1862 and with record numbers of participants in 1994 (41,500) and 1998 (45,000), Landsstævne was a booming example of what ISCA set out to celebrate and promote – the “joyful spirit” of participating in sport and cultural activities together. ISCA’s guiding philosophy was based on these pioneers’ belief in the dynamic strength of cultural diversity, organisational pluralism and their desire to help individual citizens exercise their right to physical activity. It was underpinned by sociologist Henning Eichberg’s notion of a “third way of sports”, which sees mass participation sport not as something competitive, but as an intrinsic part of popular culture and civic movement. A driving force behind the founding members’ first steps towards creating an association was that many grassroots sport organisations found themselves excluded from existing international sport structures, like the single sport federation structure, because of the “one country, one member rule”. The grassroots approach was also neglected by the international federations, whose primary focus was to standardise rules for international competitions. The founding members simply felt that the grassroots sport voice was missing internationally. So did many other organisations when they heard about ISCA. By 1998, 42 members had joined the movement and by the new millennium, ISCA was well on its way to being an umbrella for 100 likeminded organisations.Meet us at LandsstævneWe will be at DGI Landsstævne on Thursday and Friday, and you can meet us at the European Fitness Badge stand. If you are going to the event, you can experience over 400 events in 25 different sports from badminton to unicycling – and gymnastics of course! See the full programme here And planning has already started for DGI Landsstævne in Svendborg in 2021! By Rachel Payne, ISCA  
    ISCA staff embark on a “pilgrimage” back to our organisation’s “grassroots” at DGI Landdstævne
  • Celebrating women in sport and physical activity: New ISCA knowledge platform
    This week we are celebrating Women’s Sport Week, a UK initiative of the charity organisation Women in Sport. This organisation is taking big strides to promote opportunities to engage in sport and physical activity – from participating, to volunteering and working in the sport sector.  We feature many of their good examples on our Women in Sport knowledge platform, which ISCA created as a partner of the Alice Milliat Foundation’s Erasmus+ project European Network for Promotion of Women’s Sports. It is an exciting time for women in sport, with women breaking barriers to compete in sports traditionally associated with men (football codes, cricket, boxing), attracting a new wave of media coverage (particularly in Australia and the UK) and becoming the first women to compete for their countries in Olympic sports such as boxing, ski jumping and even athletics. But there is still a lot of room for awareness-raising and confidence boosting to help women in elite and grassroots sport gain equal footing with their male counterparts. We have gathered 60 examples from more than 12 countries that demonstrate tried-and-tested ways of promoting women’s participation at all levels of sport, particularly at the community level. We selected these examples according to the following criteria: they are innovative initiatives in the community sport sector; they offer knowledge and practical experience organisations can learn from; they can be adapted to new settings; they are proven to be sustainable. Visit the Women in Sport knowledge platform to find out more MEPs Emma McClarkin and Julie Ward also share their thoughts and inspiration with us - check out the story here
    Celebrating women in sport and physical activity: New ISCA knowledge platform
  • Volunteering and inclusion initiatives still crucial in grassroots sport: New data
    A new report has been published by the Social Inclusion and Volunteering in Sports Clubs in Europe project (co-funded by Erasmus+ Sport) on similarities and differences among sports clubs in Europe.The report, Characteristics of European sports clubs. A comparison of the structure, management, voluntary work and social integration among sports clubs across ten European countries, finds that recruiting and retaining members is a key challenge in Western European countries, maintaining facilities is a problem in Central and Southern European countries, volunteering remains vital to clubs in all countries, and there is still a lack of inclusion initiatives across the continent. Data from Belgium, Denmark, England, Germany, Hungary, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Spain, and Switzerland are included in the sport. ISCA President Mogens Kirkeby explains why volunteering in local sport clubs is so important to the sport sector today: "Sport clubs exist all over the world and hopefully they will continue to develop and engage millions of citizens in recreational sport and physical activity or even as volunteer trainers or club leaders. The leaders’ commitment is important to secure accessible, affordable and motivating offer to be physical active close to where we live. The volunteer trainers and leaders are important to assure there is an offer to everyone," he says. "The national culture, traditions and condition for sport clubs are clearly different across the world. Sport clubs and particular voluntary and civil society based clubs have developed under different cultures and conditions. The similarities and differences among sport clubs in Europe have been examined in a study including 35,790 clubs. The study shows a lot of both differences and similarities. But it clearly tells us the massive amount of commitment being delivered within voluntary based sports clubs. That is really MOVING PEOPLE." 
    Volunteering and inclusion initiatives still crucial in grassroots sport: New data
10th anniversary of EU White Paper on Sport a milestone for grassroots sport
Photo: MEP Sean Kelly gets active outside European Parliament (by Jana Stehlíková).  This week marks the 10th anniversary of one of the most important EU documents for the grassroots sport sector: the EU White Paper on Sport. The White Paper is a policy document adopted in 2007 that recognised the importance of increasing mass participation in sport and physical activity.  Among its focus areas and proposed actions were the  "societal role of sport", "enhancing public health through physical activity" and "sport for social inclusion", and developing physical activity guidelines and offering support to civil society organisations working in grassroots sport. The Preparatory Actions funding stream in the field of sport was set up in 2009 to offer funding for these organisations to carry out projects and events related to the EU's proposed actions, and the initiative continued with the Erasmus+ Sport programme in 2014. ISCA Secretary General Jacob Schouenborg commented on the day that the anniversary "indeed marks a milestone in the clever path of EU Sport to move from merely policing professional sport to promoting grassroots sport". The EU White Paper on Sport is available online here

You will like working with us!

Read more »
 

Navigate through the ISCA Youth portal

Read more »
 

The best way to look back at the grassroots sport sector

Read more »
 
 

The 6th European edition of NowWeMOVE’s signature event MOVE Week was on 29 May-4 June 2017. Stay tuned for the dates for 2018. and MOVE Week in Latin America (Semana Muévela and Semana MOVE Brasil) will take place from 23-30 September 2017.

Read more »

The MOVE Congress 2017 will be held in Birmingham, UK, from 4-6 October. Registration is now open and the theme is the Human Right to MOVE. Visit the official MOVE Congress website for more information.

Read more »

Good Governance in Grassroots Sport Self Assessment Tool: an interactive online tool providing a range of information and templates across three themes of governance and four principles. Start your self-assessment now!

Read more »

OTHER ISCA ACTIVITIES

Inactivity Time Bomb

In 2015, ISCA commissioned a study called the 'Economic Cost of Physical Inactivity in Europe', showing that half a million Europeans die every year as a result of being physically inactive. The most common causes of death are from those diseases linked to being physically inactive, such as coronary heart disease, type II diabetes and colorectal and breast cancer. One in four adults across Europe is currently physically inactive – as are four out of five adolescents.

 

Download the full report and infographics at the official microsite http://inactivity-time-bomb.nowwemove.com/

Read more »

MOVE&Learn

Training on-line tool for non-formal Education through Sport and physical activities with young people.

Read more »