ISCA Secretariat: Vester Voldgade 100, 2, DK-1552 Copenhagen, Denmark Tel.: +45 29 48 55 51 / info@isca-web.org
  • MOVING AGE: Networking for constructive partnerships in active ageing
    The expected impact of demographic changes on society has pushed the topic of ageing high on the political agenda all over the world. Despite the overwhelmingly positive evidence of the benefits of physical activity, rates of physical inactivity remain unacceptably high, especially among elderly people. The recent Eurobarometer (2013) report on sport and physical activity mentioned that 70% of the 55+ age group rarely or never exercise or play sport, while 57% rarely or never engage in other physical activities. It also showed that physical activity levels tend to decrease markedly after people turn 40. The challenge to promote physical activity for elderly people is too big for one stakeholder only and even for the sport sector alone! Building constructive partnerships between different stakeholders and sectors is therefore the natural step forward. As a regular cooperation between sport-related organisations on an international level in the area of active ageing does not exist so far, ISCA has offered to set up an appropriate network. This was recently launched during the MOVE Congress 2014 in Rome, under the name of “MOVING Age”. The mission of the MOVING Age Network is to stimulate and facilitate the exchange of knowledge and good practices in sport and physical activity for elderly people. In addition to this, the main objectives of the network are: •  To regularly exchange knowledge and experience between network partners.•  To collect and to disseminate existing knowledge on active ageing via digital tools.•  To promote and to initiate partnerships inside the network and with cross-sector stakeholders/networks.•  To stimulate new projects among the network’s partners.•  To recruit new network partners.•  To provide expertise/experts for advice and consultation. The MOVING Age Network is open to all entities from inside and outside the sport-sector with an interest in promoting physical activity and sport among elderly people. Until now, 20 entities have already registered as partners in the network. 
    MOVING AGE: Networking for constructive partnerships in active ageing
  • ISCA Annual Report 2014 Now Available!
    2014 has seen new paths open up for ISCA and its partners to get more people active. We believe that challenges should be turned into opportunities in order to give the best impulse to get society moving. This Annual Report has been designed to offer you a clear picture of the action plan we followed during the past year. Indeed it provides a comprehensive insight into ISCA’s work, both with respect to political priorities, achievements and the numerous international projects that have been implemented throughout the past year. Furthermore, the report features the President’s address calling for cross-sector collaboration and partnerships. It also includes financial pointers regarding the organisation’s financial development.  The report is available in print and online.Request your hard copy at info@isca-web.org or download the Annual Report 2014 below.
    ISCA Annual Report 2014 Now Available!
  • ISCA members test their governance at General Assembly
    ISCA’s Good Governance in Grassroots Sport Self-Assessment Tool was given a workout prior to the ISCA General Assembly in Rome in October, where ISCA members assessed their governance at a workshop led by Good Governance in Grassroots Sport project partners Mark Lowther (Cardiff Metropolitan University, Wales) and Simone DiGennaro (University of Cassino and Southern Lazio, Italy). In this article, Lowther and DiGennaro give their perspectives on good governance and present their findings from the workshop. While there are a number of perfectly reasonable definitions in the literature, we would summarise governance as the “philosophy and practice of steering and shaping organisational life and performance”. It is a holistic and co-ordinated approach arguably more aligned with concepts such as vision and culture, but also clearly influencing more practical day-to-day matters such as strategy, productivity and change. A governance philosophy is usually characterised by active consideration of three principles, openness, fairness and effectiveness, which underpin and inform leadership actions and interactions. Governance practice then normally centres on - and is typically demonstrated by - a balance (and emphasis as required) of three areas of work. These areas of work are establishing internal controls, maximising internal capabilities and remaining alive to the external environment (and the wider stakeholder community). It should also be noted that the process of defining governance is an important organisational activity in order to facilitate debate, surface a collective understanding of the topic and thereafter agree the conditions for good governance to develop. During the ISCA General Assembly in Rome on 25 October 2014, ISCA’s members reviewed the findings of their self-assessment using the Good Governance in Grassroots Sport Self-Assessment Tool. The tool (including a straightforward scoring mechanism) can be found here and the Guidelines for Good Governance in Grassroots Sport can be found here Following a call to action to complete the self-assessment process, we received 190 responses from 72 ISCA membership organisations. An analysis of the data indicated that the mean for the population was 2.6 on a scale from 1-4, with 4 being the best result. In other words the current level of performance is between what we would describe as progressing and developed. This suggests a positive direction of travel and the ISCA’s members should be encouraged by this indicator of systemic health. On the other hand, the analysis also suggests that more could be done with regard process and the finer details of implementation. However “good governance at the grassroots is not abstract, exclusive or complicated – it’s about the daily acts of ordinary people doing the right thing. The right thing is what is best for others and sport itself”. In this endeavour ISCA’s staff are able to provide further support and information including practical documented resources and signposting to subject experts. As the world in general and the grassroots sports sector in particular becomes more complex and competitive, so the demands - and opportunities - increase. Some of the obvious challenges include securing funding from investors, managing risk in the organisation and building trust with stakeholders. These challenges will not go away, neither will the need to actively manage them and secure discretionary efforts and innovative insights from the (significantly volunteer-based) staff working with grassroots sport. Our personal choice then becomes how best to address these challenges. The current emphasis on the sector largely self-regulating its affairs and implementing appropriate governance practices enables organisations not only to meet these challenges, but to perform better and contribute to their communities. The Good Governance in Grassroots Sport Self-Assessment Tool and Guidelines were developed through the ISCA project Good Governance in Grassroots Sport (GGGS). The project was supported by the EU under the “2011 Preparatory Action in the Field of Sport”. 
    ISCA members test their governance at General Assembly
  • Using song and music as an energiser at a congress
    During MOVE Congress 2014, the participants made music! Everyone was surprised in the good way, opened to movement and music, going with the “rhythm”. On how this was possible, the congress convenor Sean Blair and Tom Currie from Music and Movement, shared their experienced regarding this energising initiative.Sean Blair – ProMeet, UKIn early 2014 I was asked by ISCA to suggest inspiring new ways to begin the ‘MOVE Congress’, an annual three-day conference for about 300 people from all over the world. I suggested using song as a way to get all 300 people immediately working together with the hope that in asking people to sing (participants would not be expecting this request!), it would also tell participants that this is not a traditional congress where they get spoken at for 3 days, but a congress that invited their heartfelt participation right from the start, giving them permission to think, work and act in new ways. Having worked in a music business, AudioFuel, for 5 years, I knew a talented composer in Howie Saunders, and my closest friend Tom Currie is an accomplished conductor and composer. My experience of making music to help people exercise also suggested that if properly planned we might be able to deliver three interactive singing ‘energisers’ (one on each day of the congress), but also make a final mixed and mastered track that featured participants singing and would become the anthem on the congress. ISCA was brave in accepting this suggestion and Tom and Howie took on a challenge that was way more challenging than any of us had imagined. Tom expertly drew 300 people into the unexpected process on the first day, with some simple warm up exercises, (see attached video) and delegates looked pleased with themselves after the opening evening session. (After the welcome drinks reception, as I walked back to the hotel, it was pleasing to hear delegates singing “NowWeMOVE’ as they walked home...!) On each of the next 2 days in two 15 minute sessions the participants sang different parts. The recordings we made were added into the final mix and the MOVE Congress closed with a video set the the music Tom and Howie had written, featuring singing from the delegates. It was an unusual and unexpected way to energise 300 people, but one I’d be keen to further explore. You can listen and download the song here. Tom Currie – Music & MovementWhen we first discussed the idea of movement and singing energizer sessions at the MOVE congress I felt instinctively that it would fit well for the delegates and be a natural extension to the theme of the event. What I didn't know was how the delegates would sound and, as we were planning to record them to create the souvenir of the project, that was a risk. At the first session I was very impressed by their enthusiasm and luckily their voices! The group was musical and we just had to capture their performance to use in the composition. In conversations with delegates across the three days I also got a strong sense of what an important role music played in their lives and work. It was really fun leading the sessions and after the playback of the final piece I was proud of what had been accomplished through the project and grateful for the great support of everyone involved. As I flew back to London that night my mind was buzzing with ideas on how to build on the creative process, explore other themes, involve delegates in the composition and create a more ambitious end product. I do hope we get to work together again!  
    Using song and music as an energiser at a congress
  • Post-congress statements from Mogens Kirkeby and Vicenzo Manco
    Presidents of both ISCA and UISP, the organisations responsible for organising the MOVE Congress 2014, gave their post-congress statements, highlighting the conclusions of a successful event, the lessons learnt and how we can apply them to the every-day life.President of ISCA, Mogens KirkebyOpen cities – Active Cities, that is our dream. Unfortunately, the very strong global trend of urbanisation is creating many barriers for an active lifestyle, with only little room for recreational physical activity and sport. We need to change and develop our cities in such ways that physical activity is integrated in the daily life of the citizens and recreational sport is easily accessible. The question mayors should ask themselves is “How do we create a ‘political infrastructure’ for cross sector collaboration, aiming for more active cities?” This is not an easy task, but necessary to make the urban environment more liveable. MOVE Congress 2014 has showed that there is a growing interest from various sectors to find solutions – and that is very encouraging, but not enough. There is a need for a strong “political infrastructure”, a solid platform for cross sector collaboration to make an efficient and sustainable impact. Otherwise, the single cross sector initiatives will remain good, but small initiatives with very little impact. With strong “political infrastructure”, sectors like city planning, transportation, public health and recreational sport, can establish cross sector collaborations with a much higher impact and more sustainability. President of UISP, Vicenzo MancoMove Congress in Rome has sent a strong message to the European Parliament and the Italian Government, which is that “sport for all” is an internationally recognised movement. It is also a concrete reality, made of active citizens able to self organize and create networks, through good practices.ISCA has been able to coordinate and represent this movement at a global and European level, by promoting a better understanding of the social values of sport and integrating it in projects that tackle health and well being issues, education of citizens on matters of sport and physical activity, as well as promoting integration, solidarity and environment sustainability. For UISP it has been an honour to organise the 8th edition of MOVE Congress in Rome and I wish to thanks all of the volunteers, congress staff and the all the performers who contributed to this success. We have presented a series of good practices from different countries, for improving the liveability of the cities and their citizens. Recognising the social values of sport and working towards the sustainability of the urban development, lead to improving the society we live in. Increasing the people’s level of movement, it means more physical efficiency, but also higher awareness in its own means and rights. UISP is engaged in Italy to support the heritage of sport practice, participation and civil commitment, represented by more than 110.000 sport clubs in Italy. We hope that in short time, we will have a law regarding the social value of sport, which is currently under discussion at the Italian Parliament. Moreover, UISP believes in a deep change of the sport culture in our country, which underlines the importance of the movement as education, expression and sociality. We believe that the interaction with other European cultures could strengthen this perspective.
    Post-congress statements from Mogens Kirkeby and Vicenzo Manco
MOVING AGE: Networking for constructive partnerships in active ageing
The expected impact of demographic changes on society has pushed the topic of ageing high on the political agenda all over the world. Despite the overwhelmingly positive evidence of the benefits of physical activity, rates of physical inactivity remain unacceptably high, especially among elderly people. The recent Eurobarometer (2013) report on sport and physical activity mentioned that 70% of the 55+ age group rarely or never exercise or play sport, while 57% rarely or never engage in other physical activities. It also showed that physical activity levels tend to decrease markedly after people turn 40. The challenge to promote physical activity for elderly people is too big for one stakeholder only and even for the sport sector alone! Building constructive partnerships between different stakeholders and sectors is therefore the natural step forward. As a regular cooperation between sport-related organisations on an international level in the area of active ageing does not exist so far, ISCA has offered to set up an appropriate network. This was recently launched during the MOVE Congress 2014 in Rome, under the name of “MOVING Age”. The mission of the MOVING Age Network is to stimulate and facilitate the exchange of knowledge and good practices in sport and physical activity for elderly people. In addition to this, the main objectives of the network are: •  To regularly exchange knowledge and experience between network partners.•  To collect and to disseminate existing knowledge on active ageing via digital tools.•  To promote and to initiate partnerships inside the network and with cross-sector stakeholders/networks.•  To stimulate new projects among the network’s partners.•  To recruit new network partners.•  To provide expertise/experts for advice and consultation. The MOVING Age Network is open to all entities from inside and outside the sport-sector with an interest in promoting physical activity and sport among elderly people. Until now, 20 entities have already registered as partners in the network. 

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NowWeMOVE is a European-wide campaign to promote sport and physical activity. The cross-sector vision of the campaign to get “100 million more Europeans active in sport and physical activity by 2020”. MOVE Week is an annual Europe-wide event and an integral part of the NowWeMOVE campaign. This year, MOVE Week will take place from 29 September to 5 October.

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This year one of Europe’s oldest, most populated and most visited cities will provide a fitting backdrop for the MOVE Congress 2014 and its theme Open city – Active city. from 22 to 25 October 2014 in Rome-Italy.

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MOVE Quality aims to identify initiatives which inspire more people to be physically active, build the capacity of the organisations delivering them and reward their achievements with a Quality Mark.

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ISCA has created MOVE Transfer as a process of identifying physical activity initiatives for hard-to-reach populations that have run successfully in one setting and transferring them to a new setting (new organisation, new community).

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Good Governance in Grassroots Sport Self Assessment Tool: an interactive online tool providing a range of information and templates across three themes of governance and four principles. Start your self assessment now!

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OTHER ISCA ACTIVITIES

Active Network

The ACTIVE Network project has identified partnerships between local authorities and sport organizations to be of such critical value...

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MOVE&Learn

Training on-line tool for non-formal Education through Sport and physical activities with young people.

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