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  • Using song and music as an energiser at a congress
    During MOVE Congress 2014, the participants made music! Everyone was surprised in the good way, opened to movement and music, going with the “rhythm”. On how this was possible, the congress convenor Sean Blair and Tom Currie from Music and Movement, shared their experienced regarding this energising initiative.Sean Blair – ProMeet, UKIn early 2014 I was asked by ISCA to suggest inspiring new ways to begin the ‘MOVE Congress’, an annual three-day conference for about 300 people from all over the world. I suggested using song as a way to get all 300 people immediately working together with the hope that in asking people to sing (participants would not be expecting this request!), it would also tell participants that this is not a traditional congress where they get spoken at for 3 days, but a congress that invited their heartfelt participation right from the start, giving them permission to think, work and act in new ways. Having worked in a music business, AudioFuel, for 5 years, I knew a talented composer in Howie Saunders, and my closest friend Tom Currie is an accomplished conductor and composer. My experience of making music to help people exercise also suggested that if properly planned we might be able to deliver three interactive singing ‘energisers’ (one on each day of the congress), but also make a final mixed and mastered track that featured participants singing and would become the anthem on the congress. ISCA was brave in accepting this suggestion and Tom and Howie took on a challenge that was way more challenging than any of us had imagined. Tom expertly drew 300 people into the unexpected process on the first day, with some simple warm up exercises, (see attached video) and delegates looked pleased with themselves after the opening evening session. (After the welcome drinks reception, as I walked back to the hotel, it was pleasing to hear delegates singing “NowWeMOVE’ as they walked home...!) On each of the next 2 days in two 15 minute sessions the participants sang different parts. The recordings we made were added into the final mix and the MOVE Congress closed with a video set the the music Tom and Howie had written, featuring singing from the delegates. It was an unusual and unexpected way to energise 300 people, but one I’d be keen to further explore. You can listen and download the song here. Tom Currie – Music & MovementWhen we first discussed the idea of movement and singing energizer sessions at the MOVE congress I felt instinctively that it would fit well for the delegates and be a natural extension to the theme of the event. What I didn't know was how the delegates would sound and, as we were planning to record them to create the souvenir of the project, that was a risk. At the first session I was very impressed by their enthusiasm and luckily their voices! The group was musical and we just had to capture their performance to use in the composition. In conversations with delegates across the three days I also got a strong sense of what an important role music played in their lives and work. It was really fun leading the sessions and after the playback of the final piece I was proud of what had been accomplished through the project and grateful for the great support of everyone involved. As I flew back to London that night my mind was buzzing with ideas on how to build on the creative process, explore other themes, involve delegates in the composition and create a more ambitious end product. I do hope we get to work together again!  
    Using song and music as an energiser at a congress
  • Post-congress statements from Mogens Kirkeby and Vicenzo Manco
    Presidents of both ISCA and UISP, the organisations responsible for organising the MOVE Congress 2014, gave their post-congress statements, highlighting the conclusions of a successful event, the lessons learnt and how we can apply them to the every-day life.President of ISCA, Mogens KirkebyOpen cities – Active Cities, that is our dream. Unfortunately, the very strong global trend of urbanisation is creating many barriers for an active lifestyle, with only little room for recreational physical activity and sport. We need to change and develop our cities in such ways that physical activity is integrated in the daily life of the citizens and recreational sport is easily accessible. The question mayors should ask themselves is “How do we create a ‘political infrastructure’ for cross sector collaboration, aiming for more active cities?” This is not an easy task, but necessary to make the urban environment more liveable. MOVE Congress 2014 has showed that there is a growing interest from various sectors to find solutions – and that is very encouraging, but not enough. There is a need for a strong “political infrastructure”, a solid platform for cross sector collaboration to make an efficient and sustainable impact. Otherwise, the single cross sector initiatives will remain good, but small initiatives with very little impact. With strong “political infrastructure”, sectors like city planning, transportation, public health and recreational sport, can establish cross sector collaborations with a much higher impact and more sustainability. President of UISP, Vicenzo MancoMove Congress in Rome has sent a strong message to the European Parliament and the Italian Government, which is that “sport for all” is an internationally recognised movement. It is also a concrete reality, made of active citizens able to self organize and create networks, through good practices.ISCA has been able to coordinate and represent this movement at a global and European level, by promoting a better understanding of the social values of sport and integrating it in projects that tackle health and well being issues, education of citizens on matters of sport and physical activity, as well as promoting integration, solidarity and environment sustainability. For UISP it has been an honour to organise the 8th edition of MOVE Congress in Rome and I wish to thanks all of the volunteers, congress staff and the all the performers who contributed to this success. We have presented a series of good practices from different countries, for improving the liveability of the cities and their citizens. Recognising the social values of sport and working towards the sustainability of the urban development, lead to improving the society we live in. Increasing the people’s level of movement, it means more physical efficiency, but also higher awareness in its own means and rights. UISP is engaged in Italy to support the heritage of sport practice, participation and civil commitment, represented by more than 110.000 sport clubs in Italy. We hope that in short time, we will have a law regarding the social value of sport, which is currently under discussion at the Italian Parliament. Moreover, UISP believes in a deep change of the sport culture in our country, which underlines the importance of the movement as education, expression and sociality. We believe that the interaction with other European cultures could strengthen this perspective.
    Post-congress statements from Mogens Kirkeby and Vicenzo Manco
  • Interview with MOVE in a Click winner Greta Vaisėtaitė
     This year the MOVE Congress held a photo contest for the first time called MOVE in a Click, inviting people worldwide to enter images that said something about physical activity to them. The winning photo was a black and white titled "No Limits" by 18-year-old Lithuanian secondary school student Greta Vaisėtaitė. ISCA spoke to Greta about what motivated her to enter the contest and the story behind "No Limits".  1.   How did you find out about the MOVE in a Click photo contest?I found it in http://www.zinauviska.lt/lt/ website.  2. Why did you decide to send a photo for the MOVE in a Click photo contest?When I participated in one contest last year, I filled in a postcard, on which I promised to myself to say "why not?" more. So, I started to look more optimistically at the world. I started to participate in various contests from then on. 3. What is the idea behind your photo? What does it say about physical activity? Everyone can do sports. It doesn't matter how old you are, how you look and so on. 4. Why did you take a picture of a boy and a girl playing basketball? And is there any reason why the girl is wearing a dress and has bare feet? And why did you call it No Limits?That picture I took accidentally. They just played basketball and made a huge contrast, which I liked. Why No Limits? Because we see that girl isn’t ready to do sports and I just wanted to say that to do sports we don't need to be ready - we can do it without any reason. 5. What is your idea of a good photo? The most important aspects of a good photo for me are quality and a well expressed idea. 
    Interview with MOVE in a Click winner Greta Vaisėtaitė
  • Three speakers, three areas of action highlighted at MOVE Congress 2014 closing
     It had been less than 48 hours since experts from Italy and abroad sat on the MOVE Congress 2014 stage to start the discussion on open and active cities. In the meantime, 36 speakers and moderators had led over 300 delegates through the many interwoven factors that make cities inviting spaces or barriers for physical activity. On the closing evening, three of these speakers pinpointed three areas they know better than most in which they thought the delegates could push for more action. René Kural, from the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Schools of Architecture, Design and Conservation, used his own experience in architecture to identify the design element of urban planning as something that should be influenced: “As an architect, I know that if a client doesn’t want an active city, it won’t happen. That’s why we should educate our architects,” he said. Niamh Murphy, from the Waterford Institute of Technology in Ireland, said she saw great power to be gained from research in the field of sport and physical activity, and that the MOVE Congress was a promising platform to share the results: “I saw some good examples of people using good data that can influence policy makers,” she said. “So how can we harness the excellent science to go alongside the excellent practice?” Like Murphy, ISCA Secretary General Jacob Schouenborg also pointed to the value of questioning authorities and other stakeholders in prime positions to create change in order to help drive that change. Advocating for sport and physical activity among policy makers is something that even the average citizen should feel that they can do, he said: “Be confident enough to say to them that physical activity is a human right – why are you not giving it to us?” ISCA President Mogens Kirkeby closed the MOVE Congress 2014 with an accent on creativity and inventiveness, as well as the power of grassroots organisations to make things happen. He highlighted a term used by Dutch speaker Remco Hoekman, “orgware” (as opposed to software and hardware), to emphasise that you need sound organisational structures in place for facilities to work and for busy people to want to be active in them. The final nod to creativity and inventiveness was made in the unveiling of the NowWeMOVE anthem and video, compiled by AudioFuel duo Howie Saunders and Tom Currie during the congress. The song features the MOVE Congress 2014 delegates’ voices, with the men and women being recorded separately from opposite sides of the room. Innovative, active and truly in the spirit of the MOVE Congress. See you next year! Listen to and downlaod the NowWeMOVE anthem hereBy Rachel Payne
    Three speakers, three areas of action highlighted at MOVE Congress 2014 closing
  • Friday afternoon was something else
     The project I’d like to see in my cityAn innovative initiative introduced by Sean Blair, the convenor of the MOVE Congress 2014 from Pro Meet UK, was the Open Space workshop. What is that, you may wonder? “Open Space workshop means having a coffee with a friend, where you declare what you want to talk about” and the participants can “use the law of two feet” and leave the discussion if they are not interested. The “coffee drinkers” were speakers, moderators and participants who had discussions in smaller groups and addressed the possibilities of several issues agreed upon prior to the discussion, by finishing the following sentence: “The project I would like to see carried out in my city or by my organisation is…” It was an interactive and relaxing session and the participants could move around and “visit” several topics of interest. “Mama Said Knock You Out”No, LL Cool J wasn’t present at the MOVE Congress 2014, but Marvin Radford from ISCA used his lyrics combined with boxing movements to energise the packed crowd that was present for the Erasmus+ Fundraising Session. It is good to have an idea and to want to change lives and behaviours through sport, but how would you get the money for it? Michal Rynkowski from the EU Sport Unit introduced the Erasmus+ programme and explained how it differed from the previous Preparatory Actions funding streams previously offered by the European Commission. Philippe De Witte, from EU Sport Link Belgium, presented the Dos and Don’ts of Erasmus+ Sport project proposals, advice about seeking partnerships and insights into the European Commission’s procedures when it comes to the applications. “You need the entire team to be part of the project, therefore, you need to assess the capability and commitment of the team and organisation,” he said, as getting funding for your projects is not an easy task, and only the well prepared can make it through the jungle of applications. On the practical side, Rachel Payne guided the participants through the practicalities of such proposals, presenting the forms and additional documentation in detail.By Roxana Chiriac
    Friday afternoon was something else
Using song and music as an energiser at a congress
During MOVE Congress 2014, the participants made music! Everyone was surprised in the good way, opened to movement and music, going with the “rhythm”. On how this was possible, the congress convenor Sean Blair and Tom Currie from Music and Movement, shared their experienced regarding this energising initiative.Sean Blair – ProMeet, UKIn early 2014 I was asked by ISCA to suggest inspiring new ways to begin the ‘MOVE Congress’, an annual three-day conference for about 300 people from all over the world. I suggested using song as a way to get all 300 people immediately working together with the hope that in asking people to sing (participants would not be expecting this request!), it would also tell participants that this is not a traditional congress where they get spoken at for 3 days, but a congress that invited their heartfelt participation right from the start, giving them permission to think, work and act in new ways. Having worked in a music business, AudioFuel, for 5 years, I knew a talented composer in Howie Saunders, and my closest friend Tom Currie is an accomplished conductor and composer. My experience of making music to help people exercise also suggested that if properly planned we might be able to deliver three interactive singing ‘energisers’ (one on each day of the congress), but also make a final mixed and mastered track that featured participants singing and would become the anthem on the congress. ISCA was brave in accepting this suggestion and Tom and Howie took on a challenge that was way more challenging than any of us had imagined. Tom expertly drew 300 people into the unexpected process on the first day, with some simple warm up exercises, (see attached video) and delegates looked pleased with themselves after the opening evening session. (After the welcome drinks reception, as I walked back to the hotel, it was pleasing to hear delegates singing “NowWeMOVE’ as they walked home...!) On each of the next 2 days in two 15 minute sessions the participants sang different parts. The recordings we made were added into the final mix and the MOVE Congress closed with a video set the the music Tom and Howie had written, featuring singing from the delegates. It was an unusual and unexpected way to energise 300 people, but one I’d be keen to further explore. You can listen and download the song here. Tom Currie – Music & MovementWhen we first discussed the idea of movement and singing energizer sessions at the MOVE congress I felt instinctively that it would fit well for the delegates and be a natural extension to the theme of the event. What I didn't know was how the delegates would sound and, as we were planning to record them to create the souvenir of the project, that was a risk. At the first session I was very impressed by their enthusiasm and luckily their voices! The group was musical and we just had to capture their performance to use in the composition. In conversations with delegates across the three days I also got a strong sense of what an important role music played in their lives and work. It was really fun leading the sessions and after the playback of the final piece I was proud of what had been accomplished through the project and grateful for the great support of everyone involved. As I flew back to London that night my mind was buzzing with ideas on how to build on the creative process, explore other themes, involve delegates in the composition and create a more ambitious end product. I do hope we get to work together again!  

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NowWeMOVE is a European-wide campaign to promote sport and physical activity. The cross-sector vision of the campaign to get “100 million more Europeans active in sport and physical activity by 2020”. MOVE Week is an annual Europe-wide event and an integral part of the NowWeMOVE campaign. This year, MOVE Week will take place from 29 September to 5 October.

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This year one of Europe’s oldest, most populated and most visited cities will provide a fitting backdrop for the MOVE Congress 2014 and its theme Open city – Active city. from 22 to 25 October 2014 in Rome-Italy.

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MOVE Quality aims to identify initiatives which inspire more people to be physically active, build the capacity of the organisations delivering them and reward their achievements with a Quality Mark.

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ISCA has created MOVE Transfer as a process of identifying physical activity initiatives for hard-to-reach populations that have run successfully in one setting and transferring them to a new setting (new organisation, new community).

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Good Governance in Grassroots Sport Self Assessment Tool: an interactive online tool providing a range of information and templates across three themes of governance and four principles. Start your self assessment now!

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OTHER ISCA ACTIVITIES

Active Network

The ACTIVE Network project has identified partnerships between local authorities and sport organizations to be of such critical value...

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MOVE&Learn

Training on-line tool for non-formal Education through Sport and physical activities with young people.

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