ISCA Secretariat: Vester Voldgade 100, 2, DK-1552 Copenhagen, Denmark - CVR 29 50 05 41 Tel: +45 29 48 55 51 / info@isca-web.org
  • ISCA highlights civil society role in feedback to WHO on “Global action plan to promote physical activity” draft
    The World Health Organisation (WHO) is developing a “Global action plan to promote physical activity”, and it is expected to be adopted at the World Health Assembly in May 2018. A draft is now published and open for consultation until the end of this week. We believe that this is a key opportunity for ISCA and our members to promote the importance of grassroots sport and physical activity for health and for wider social outcomes. Therefore, ISCA has gathered comments from our member organisations on the draft and will in our response tomorrow highlight the key role that civil society organisations and grassroots sport can play to promote physical activity. We will also underline the relevance of various ISCA initiatives and the availability of ISCA and its member organisations to deliver on the promises of the action plan with member states and other stakeholders. A summary of the general comments we have gathered so far is listed below: We highly welcome the WHO initiative and support the focus on cross-sector collaboration and action, as well as the planned process of consultation in preparation of the plan. Civil society’s role has much too little emphasis. There is a LOT on what governments should do. There is some on what secretariat should do. And then an unclear category of “international and national partners” – with rather vague roles. Civil society offers a cost-effective, localised and permanent structure to deliver citizens-oriented physical activity without political or commercial interest. And it must be harnessed and supported. Civil society should be at the forefront of the action plan – as it, and particularly grassroots sport and recreational physical activity – is all about action. We recommend this be highlighted in the structure of the document. But it is also relevant in the action parts of the plan, for instance Action 1.2, #62, where the member states’ role is recommended to be implementing community events. Knowing governments have limited reach and capacity in implementing community events, this calls for clever collaboration between relevant stakeholders with interest and capacity to run activities. We would strongly underline the important role member states should play to support civil society and grassroots sport organisations as they deliver physical activity events and grassroots sport training opportunities on a daily basis. This could be implemented throughout many of the recommendations for member states – indeed the role to support and finance research is, for comparison, mentioned in recommendation 152. We support the work to link the physical activity efforts to the Sustainable Development Goals. We would argue that physical activity has a clear, standalone human rights dimension too – and that this should be highlighted because it will enhance the political discussion and give priority to physical activity. We call it: The Human Right to MOVE (see for example our upcoming MOVE Congress www.movecongress.com in Birmingham on 4-6 October (note: this is different and more specific compared to the Human Right to Health, as mentioned in point 47)).  Sport has great potential to promote physical activity. But we should understand that this is not primarily in professional sport, sport spectator events (or football specifically for that matter) – it is in grassroots sport and recreational physical activity. We wonder why sport’s role for “national character and value” is important in this context? And why mention UNOSDP as it is now closing? Indeed, a shift in sport policy towards participation is needed – we welcome that message entirely. As for recommendation 56, we find that using sport events to promote physical activity may be relevant and possible (although the promises of mega sport events to enhance citizen participation most often fail) but it likely is an only indirect and inefficient at best (or potentially directly counter-productive) way to promote physical activity: If the goal is to promote participation – we recommend to invest resources in that, not in spectator sport events. We would recommend using even more the power of the good example and good practice in the document – and beyond. The many practitioners out there are likely more inspired by that than any theoretical-only construct or solution. ISCA has in fact been developing several such “good practice collections” for physical activity promotion, see e.g. Women in Sport http://womeninsport.isca.org/ and are happy to do so also going forward. The role of the WHO secretariat is described in multiple instances to be developing guidelines, manuals, menus of options, case studies, etc. We would like to question, firstly, if such information and guidance is actually what is needed (given that a plethora of manuals and good practices already exists in this field, and since we are not sure that lack of such tools is actually the primary barrier) and secondly if the secretariat is foreseen to have the resources to actually deliver the many proposed items. We would instead recommend that the secretariat is recommended to liaise (more) with relevant international stakeholders, not least civil society ones, to deliver coordination, collaboration, shared use and promotion of existing resources. We at ISCA would be strongly interested in such a collaboration, while of course respecting that the main stakeholders for WHO remain member states. ISCA has been delivering and developing its international physical activity campaign NowWeMOVE (www.nowwemove.com) since 2012, and with substantial results. For instance, the flagship initiative MOVE Week delivered 7125 events engaging 1.8 million individual citizens in the European edition in 2015, and 7674 events in Latin America in 2016, with the 2017 edition starting on 23 September. Other initiatives of the NowWeMOVE Campaign are increasing in popularity and include No Elevators Day, European School Sport Day (with our partner Hungarian School Sport Federation), FlashMOVE, etc. ISCA is happy to take on its role as promoter of good practice, advocacy, collaboration and action, including with NowWeMOVE, as a part of the activation of the WHO Global Action Plan.  We will inform our members and followers when we receive news about the next steps. The draft action plan and progress towards its development can be accessed here Photo: Military Health
    ISCA highlights civil society role in feedback to WHO on “Global action plan to promote physical activity” draft
  • Czech Sokol calls for expressions of interest for XVIth All-Sokol Slet event
    ISCA member the Czech Sokol Organisation is inviting performance teams and individuals to express their interest in attending the XVIth All-Sokol Slet 2018 in Prague, the Czech Republic, which will take place from 1-7 July 2018. The last All-Sokol Slet was held in 2012 in Prague. The event dates back all the way to 1882, and is still going strong despite having been threatened by two world wars and totalitarian regimes. The attractiveness of this event on the sport for all calendar is a testament to its enduring tradition. You can participate in a large group performance in a sport arena, stage performances through the centre of Prague or share your experience and ideas in a Seminar on the future of large group performances. You can also arrive as a spectator, meet a lot of people and enjoy the Slet atmosphere your own way. For more information about the program, travel, accommodation and much more, please find download the PDF file below: "XVIth All-Sokol Slet 2018 Prague - First Bulletin". We kindly request you to send preliminary notification of interest to bvilimovska@sokol.eu until 25 October 2017. Please fill in the document below titled: "XVIth All-Sokol Slet 2018 Prague - Notification of Interest".
    Czech Sokol calls for expressions of interest for XVIth All-Sokol Slet event
  • ISCA to get UN City Copenhagen moving on Europe’s most active day
    The International Sport and Culture Association, as designated coordinator of the European Week of Sport in Denmark, will be getting staff at the UN headquarters in Copenhagen moving on 27 September at part of “the most active day in Europe”. Together with a team of international students from the Ollerup Academy of Physical Education, ISCA will organise MOVEment Pills office exercise sessions, come-and-try activities, and a taste of the European Fitness Badge fitness tests during the lunch break in the UN City Lobby area. Staff from both UN City and WHO Europe are invited to join in the activities as it suits them. The most active day in Europe coincides with key Europe-wide physical activity initiatives that are happening on the same day: European Fitness Day and the FlashMOVE (coordinated by ISCA), ukactive’s National Fitness Day in the UK and the 5th day of the #BeActive European Week of Sport 2017. Thousands of Europeans are expected to be exercising and dancing in fitness centres, clubs, on city squares and in their workplaces on the day. All of these activities aims at promoting participation in sport and physical activity and at raising awareness about the numerous benefits of both. They are for everyone – regardless of age, background or fitness level and activate individuals, public authorities, the sport for all sector, civil society organisations and the private sector. DID YOU KNOW! WHO Europe recently launched its “Physical Activity Strategy for the WHO European Region 2016-2025”UNICEF’s work with sport aims to ensure that every child has the right to play and sport in a safe and healthy environmentAction on Physical Activity can contribute to achieving 8 Sustainable development Goals  For more information about the European Week of Sport in Denmark, please visit http://europeanweekofsport.dk/ 
    ISCA to get UN City Copenhagen moving on Europe’s most active day
  • Estonia developing new MOVING values with reformed “physical activity education”: Interview with Maret Pihu
    Cartoons by Liikumislabor Next year, physical education in Estonia will be making a big transition towards a more holistic system, where the main focus will be on physical activity and self-assessment.Physical activity and physical education (PE) are a mandatory part of any school curriculum. Together, they comprise one of the key approaches to developing regular exercise habits among children from as early as possible.Today, physical activity is one of the best ways to positively influence energy balance and weight control. In light of a recent WHO report on adolescent obesity and related behaviours in Europe, it is necessary to stress the importance of moving with moderate intensity.Estonia, where the prevalence of adolescents reaching the WHO’s recommended physical activity level is only just over one tenth, is now actively reforming PE in schools. Whereas the state has always highlighted PE classes as an important part of school curricula, the change from normative grading towards a holistic approach is only taking place now.We spoke with Maret Pihu, Lecturer in Didactics in University of Tartu to learn more about the reform and the changes it will bring both to the schools as well as to the stakeholders.
    Estonia developing new MOVING values with reformed “physical activity education”: Interview with Maret Pihu
  • Erasmusx10 campaign aims to give Erasmus+ budget a massive boost
    What would €2.66 billion mean to the sport and physical activity sector in Europe? If the new Erasmusx10 campaign from the EU’s Lifelong Learning Platform, European Youth Forum and Eurodesk gathers enough momentum and supporters, we could soon find out. If the campaign succeeds, it will increase the Erasmus+ programme budget by TEN times. To put this equation into perspective, it could, for example, raise the number of Erasmus+ Sport Collaborative Partnerships projects granted from 600 to 6000 – a mobilising force that would potentially support thousands more grassroots sport organisations, NGOs, local authorities and other stakeholders in our sector. The Erasmus+ programme is already distributing €14.7 billion to initiatives in education, training, youth and sport over a period spanning from 2014-2020. But as Erasmus+ celebrates its 30th anniversary this year, speculation about what the next steps will be for the programme and calls from stakeholders including the President of the European Commission, Jean-Claude Juncker, to increase its budget have also followed suit. These calls have culminated in the Lifelong Learning Platform’s Erasmusx10 campaign and petition to convert talk into action. The campaign was launched last week and over 1000 people have already signed the petition. ISCA supports this initiative, and our diverse network of members, partners, previous volunteers, MEP supporters (such as Julie Ward from S&D), and other EU stakeholders are voicing their support on social media and the camapign’s official website http://erasmusx10.eu/ Former ISCA volunteer Valentin Dupouey Sterdyniak, who worked at ISCA in 2013-2014 as part of the Erasmus+ European Voluntary Service and is now Secretary General of the Young European Federalists, writes how the Erasmus+ programme has powerful potential to kick-start a young person’s career and engagement in society as part of the EU. “I've had the chance to take part in Erasmus+ studies thanks to Université de Strasbourg, an Erasmus internship thanks to EUSA - European University Sports Association, a European Voluntary Service and youth exchanges thanks to the International Sport and Culture Association, and to be on the other side as an Erasmus project writer/manager/evaluator thanks to the Erasmus Student Network and Young European Federalists [JEF]... all life changing experiences,” he writes. “I wish all young people in Europe could experience them! Erasmus is the embodiment of European Citizenship, and of meaningful interaction between citizens!” Find out more about the Erasmusx10 campaign and sign the petition at http://erasmusx10.eu/ By Rachel Payne, ISCAThe graphic is the official graphic and logo of the campaign 
    Erasmusx10 campaign aims to give Erasmus+ budget a massive boost
ISCA highlights civil society role in feedback to WHO on “Global action plan to promote physical activity” draft
The World Health Organisation (WHO) is developing a “Global action plan to promote physical activity”, and it is expected to be adopted at the World Health Assembly in May 2018. A draft is now published and open for consultation until the end of this week. We believe that this is a key opportunity for ISCA and our members to promote the importance of grassroots sport and physical activity for health and for wider social outcomes. Therefore, ISCA has gathered comments from our member organisations on the draft and will in our response tomorrow highlight the key role that civil society organisations and grassroots sport can play to promote physical activity. We will also underline the relevance of various ISCA initiatives and the availability of ISCA and its member organisations to deliver on the promises of the action plan with member states and other stakeholders. A summary of the general comments we have gathered so far is listed below: We highly welcome the WHO initiative and support the focus on cross-sector collaboration and action, as well as the planned process of consultation in preparation of the plan. Civil society’s role has much too little emphasis. There is a LOT on what governments should do. There is some on what secretariat should do. And then an unclear category of “international and national partners” – with rather vague roles. Civil society offers a cost-effective, localised and permanent structure to deliver citizens-oriented physical activity without political or commercial interest. And it must be harnessed and supported. Civil society should be at the forefront of the action plan – as it, and particularly grassroots sport and recreational physical activity – is all about action. We recommend this be highlighted in the structure of the document. But it is also relevant in the action parts of the plan, for instance Action 1.2, #62, where the member states’ role is recommended to be implementing community events. Knowing governments have limited reach and capacity in implementing community events, this calls for clever collaboration between relevant stakeholders with interest and capacity to run activities. We would strongly underline the important role member states should play to support civil society and grassroots sport organisations as they deliver physical activity events and grassroots sport training opportunities on a daily basis. This could be implemented throughout many of the recommendations for member states – indeed the role to support and finance research is, for comparison, mentioned in recommendation 152. We support the work to link the physical activity efforts to the Sustainable Development Goals. We would argue that physical activity has a clear, standalone human rights dimension too – and that this should be highlighted because it will enhance the political discussion and give priority to physical activity. We call it: The Human Right to MOVE (see for example our upcoming MOVE Congress www.movecongress.com in Birmingham on 4-6 October (note: this is different and more specific compared to the Human Right to Health, as mentioned in point 47)).  Sport has great potential to promote physical activity. But we should understand that this is not primarily in professional sport, sport spectator events (or football specifically for that matter) – it is in grassroots sport and recreational physical activity. We wonder why sport’s role for “national character and value” is important in this context? And why mention UNOSDP as it is now closing? Indeed, a shift in sport policy towards participation is needed – we welcome that message entirely. As for recommendation 56, we find that using sport events to promote physical activity may be relevant and possible (although the promises of mega sport events to enhance citizen participation most often fail) but it likely is an only indirect and inefficient at best (or potentially directly counter-productive) way to promote physical activity: If the goal is to promote participation – we recommend to invest resources in that, not in spectator sport events. We would recommend using even more the power of the good example and good practice in the document – and beyond. The many practitioners out there are likely more inspired by that than any theoretical-only construct or solution. ISCA has in fact been developing several such “good practice collections” for physical activity promotion, see e.g. Women in Sport http://womeninsport.isca.org/ and are happy to do so also going forward. The role of the WHO secretariat is described in multiple instances to be developing guidelines, manuals, menus of options, case studies, etc. We would like to question, firstly, if such information and guidance is actually what is needed (given that a plethora of manuals and good practices already exists in this field, and since we are not sure that lack of such tools is actually the primary barrier) and secondly if the secretariat is foreseen to have the resources to actually deliver the many proposed items. We would instead recommend that the secretariat is recommended to liaise (more) with relevant international stakeholders, not least civil society ones, to deliver coordination, collaboration, shared use and promotion of existing resources. We at ISCA would be strongly interested in such a collaboration, while of course respecting that the main stakeholders for WHO remain member states. ISCA has been delivering and developing its international physical activity campaign NowWeMOVE (www.nowwemove.com) since 2012, and with substantial results. For instance, the flagship initiative MOVE Week delivered 7125 events engaging 1.8 million individual citizens in the European edition in 2015, and 7674 events in Latin America in 2016, with the 2017 edition starting on 23 September. Other initiatives of the NowWeMOVE Campaign are increasing in popularity and include No Elevators Day, European School Sport Day (with our partner Hungarian School Sport Federation), FlashMOVE, etc. ISCA is happy to take on its role as promoter of good practice, advocacy, collaboration and action, including with NowWeMOVE, as a part of the activation of the WHO Global Action Plan.  We will inform our members and followers when we receive news about the next steps. The draft action plan and progress towards its development can be accessed here Photo: Military Health

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Navigate through the ISCA Youth portal

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The best way to look back at the grassroots sport sector

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The 6th European edition of NowWeMOVE’s signature event MOVE Week was on 29 May-4 June 2017. Stay tuned for the dates for 2018. and MOVE Week in Latin America (Semana Muévela and Semana MOVE Brasil) will take place from 23-30 September 2017.

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The MOVE Congress 2017 will be held in Birmingham, UK, from 4-6 October. Registration is now open and the theme is the Human Right to MOVE. Visit the official MOVE Congress website for more information.

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Good Governance in Grassroots Sport Self Assessment Tool: an interactive online tool providing a range of information and templates across three themes of governance and four principles. Start your self-assessment now!

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OTHER ISCA ACTIVITIES

Inactivity Time Bomb

In 2015, ISCA commissioned a study called the 'Economic Cost of Physical Inactivity in Europe', showing that half a million Europeans die every year as a result of being physically inactive. The most common causes of death are from those diseases linked to being physically inactive, such as coronary heart disease, type II diabetes and colorectal and breast cancer. One in four adults across Europe is currently physically inactive – as are four out of five adolescents.

 

Download the full report and infographics at the official microsite http://inactivity-time-bomb.nowwemove.com/

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MOVE&Learn

Training on-line tool for non-formal Education through Sport and physical activities with young people.

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