ISCA Secretariat: Vester Voldgade 100, 2, DK-1552 Copenhagen, Denmark - CVR 29 50 05 41 Tel: +45 29 48 55 51 / info@isca-web.org
  • Save the dates: No Elevators Day and MOVE Week 2018
    The time to start planning your next No Elevators Day or MOVE Week event is now. The official dates for the NowWeMOVE campaign’s biggest events in the first half of 2018 are set: No Elevators Day will take place on 25 April and MOVE Week from 28 May-3 June. No Elevators Day encourages everyone to take the stairs instead of the elevator for their health and wellbeing. It is aimed at busy office workers, but anyone can take the chance to seal off an elevator or escalator in their community as a fun way to get their peers active. No Elevators Day will go global in 2018 – stay tuned for more information. MOVE Week was established in 2012, so 2018 will be the 7th edition. Thousands of events take place simultaneously across Europe in a week-long festival of sport and physical activity. They can include open door or “try-it” events at local clubs, walking events, fun runs, bike tours, street sport events, school sports events, company activities, activities organised for hard-to-reach groups – the possibilities are only limited to our imaginations! Anyone can register as a MOVE Agent: sport clubs, schools, individuals, municipalities, companies – anyone with an interest in promoting physical activity in their communities.Find out how you can get involved in No Elevators Day Download all the resources you need to organise your own MOVE Week event
    Save the dates: No Elevators Day and MOVE Week 2018
  • My most culturally enriching experience as a PE teacher: Valuable first-hand insights for Integration of Refugees through Sport partners
    “The young men you’re about to meet are mostly from Afghanistan, aged between 16 and 20. They all came to Denmark unaccompanied. They are living in asylum centres around the country and their cases are being processed, but their future is uncertain.” When Morten Andersson (pictured above, standing in the centre), who for almost two years led a specially established “asylum school” in Ollerup on the Danish island of Funen, prepared ISCA and our Nordic partners of our Nordplus supported Integration of Refugees through Sport project to interview a group of 20 young refugees, he gave us more than a quick briefing on a group of people we didn’t know. Several hours prior to the meeting he shared with us a wealth of cultural and pedagogical insights he had gained over two years working with some of the most vulnerable people living in Denmark. “This has been my most culturally enriching experience in many years of teaching PE,” Morten told us at the Ollerup Academy of Physical Education. The complex task he was given when establishing the asylum school was to develop a physical education approach that would meet the asylum seekers’ needs, support their rehabilitation and help them learn essential language and social skills. Andersson explained that it takes a delicate touch to work with young people who are suffering from a gruelling journey, post-traumatic stress disorders from their experiences back home and on the way to Denmark, as well as a “collision of cultures” when 10 different nationalities land together in a new community. The preconditions for integration, he said, are offering a structured routine every day – including friendly greetings, games and physical activity (building up from slow, relaxing movements), and language development – with the flexibility to allow the participants take a break and come back if they need it. “We focused on the very basics of feeling human and like citizens,” he said. “Physical activity is an ease, a break from mental stress. Although it is not therapy in itself, it has a therapeutic and stabilising effect. It can help in getting the alarm and alertness out of the system.” He uses the term physical activity rather than sport, because of the common association of sport with high-tempo team sport, which involves too much contact and competition for young people who have high stress levels and are unfamiliar with each other. “Scoring a goal can be dangerous when you put high alert people on the same field,” he says, referring to cases in which fights between refugees have erupted on the football field. “On the other hand, physical activity everyday has a big effect on stabilising and reducing the arousal level.” The factors contributing to this state of alert are diverse and often related to serious traumas. From having difficulties communicating, to fears about authorities, their future and their families, to recalling deaths that they have witnessed, and severe culture shock, every day can be a battle to function normally. “Everything is different – every single thing. ‘I spend 24 hours a day adjusting. I get very tired – but I don’t sleep.’ Basically in all ways they are working on overload,” Andersson says. “One thing that keeps them going is that they laugh about things, they laugh about the system and their environment.” And that’s what we find when we sit down to meet the group of smiling, but understandably a little apprehensive, young men.Read about our interviews with the refugees in part two of this story The Integration of Refugees through Sport project is supported by NordPlus Adult and Erasmus+. The project is developing a series of videos, including a tutorial drawing on the partners’ and Morten Andersson’s expertise in working with this target group. The resources will be available in 2018. Article by Rachel Payne, ISCAPhoto by Lauriane Jagault, ISCA 
    My most culturally enriching experience as a PE teacher: Valuable first-hand insights for Integration of Refugees through Sport partners
  • “Physical activity can’t change our situation, but it can change how we feel”: Refugees talk about the realities of sport and integration
    Photo from Ollerup Academy of Physical Education activities with refugees. Having the chance to meet face-to-face and chat with people who are subject to so much turmoil and political debate was a humbling experience for all of the partners of the Integration of Refugees through Sport project. But the positive spirit of the 20 young men we met put us more at ease, as they tried to communicate to us in English and Danish, cracking a joke here and there. The conversation became even easier after the more formal group interviews when one of the young men from Afghanistan immediately found two things he and I had in common, as I am from a cricketing nation and a fellow foreigner living in Denmark. “I really like talking to you because you know about cricket,” he said, smiling, before switching to a more heart-wrenching subject without warning. “You know, I’m tired. I didn’t sleep last night because I’m worried about my friend. I don’t know where he is.” This pendulum swinging from laughter and easy chitchat to sobering stories and worries also characterised the interviews we conducted in small groups of 5-7 refugees. This was a rare opportunity to break through the surface of the distant figures we see in the media, and hear their personal perspectives and realities first-hand. What we heard was often touching and even inspiring. The main subject of the interviews was the potential for sport and physical activity to assist their integration, and the young men often talked about safety as a key concern, barrier and enabler. One of the two stronger English speakers in the group explained that his family didn’t let him play cricket in Afghanistan after bombs started being planted in local pitches. “It was super dangerous to do cricket,” he said. “When I came to Denmark I saw a safe life. It’s safe to start activities. After six months of going to a cricket club in Odense, I moved to Ærø where there was no cricket club. So I started doing yoga. It’s good for stress and it’s very fun. I participate every time – I never miss a class.” When we asked them about opportunities for female refugees to join in their activities or other community sport, they replied positively and enthusiastically – as long as it would be safe for them. “Make it a safe place for girls so they can come and participate. Some families don’t want their girls to come to a boys’ club and train. You should talk to the families and say they can go because it’s a safe place.” A football fan in the group spoke up loudly in Danish: “The girls have to decide themselves. There should be a mix. Everyone should be able to enjoy playing football.”
    “Physical activity can’t change our situation, but it can change how we feel”: Refugees talk about the realities of sport and integration
  • MOVE Week Latin America celebrated with over 10,000 events in 13 countries
    MOVE Week in Latin America (Semana MOVE Brasil in Brazil and Semana Muévela in other countries) was celebrated in three new countries from 23-30 September 2017 and tripled the number of activities offered across the continent. The rapid growth of the NowWeMOVE campaign in Latin America is a testament to the work of ISCA member Sesc and 46 of their partner organisations in Brazil in building a following for MOVE Week and Move Brasil since 2012, as well as the 28 partners who have brought the week to life in 12 other countries. This year, as well as Brazil, Semana Muévela took place in Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica (new), Cuba, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador (new), Honduras (new), Nicaragua, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela. Latin Americans could choose from at least 10,091 activities in 789 cities, from an evening of cycling on 23 September (with 1,300 participants) to basketball, surfing, tennis, skipping, running, dance, yoga, traditional games and new physical activities throughout the week. The Latin American MOVE Agents (“Movers”) also organised training workshops for teacher in public schools, as well as community “busy bees” to help decorate and maintain local sport facilities. This year, Sesc noticed more initiative from the Movers in organising their own activities for Semana Muévela. ISCA’s Youth on the MOVE project has also trained a group of young movers to organise events in their own cities, which has contributed to the growth of MOVE Week in Latin America. “Small attitudes with great intentions are capable of changing the reality of those around us,” said Youth on the MOVE participant Paula Asbahr from Instituto Barrichello Kanaan in Brazil. “Participating in Youth on the MOVE and developing actions for MOVE Week brought me strong this affirmation, and considering this action turned into a permanent project on physical activity for women.” Colombia participated for the third year in a row, and Carol Castro from Universidad Manuela Beltrán shared her motivation for taking part. “Knowing that we are increasingly coming closer together to promote physical activity has renewed and reaffirmed my commitment to mobilisation. And when mobilising those who find me on the road, I am convinced that every day we are adding movers, and the network will continue growing!” Karen Lorena González from SENA (Santander Branch) in Colombia said that "Participating in the MOVE Week 2017 was a unique experience. There was a chance to do physical activities, share with teachers from other branches from Santander and see personal and sports-related growth among all the participants" . In Argentina, Sofía Belén, ISEF Nº1 Dr. Enrique Romero Brest said, “HEALTH is the ONLY thing we need to be happy. Let’s work as a team to reduce the bad and sedentary habits. Once we continue work in the same direction, the less future challenges we will have to overcome”. Semana Muévela will build on this momentum again next year, and more NowWeMOVE actions may also be set to roll out across the continent in 2018. Stay tuned… Find out more about Semana Muévela 
    MOVE Week Latin America celebrated with over 10,000 events in 13 countries
  • “City of good thoughts” inspires a new joint action call for a healthy lifestyle
    Photos: European Commission.  The Estonian presidency of the Council of the European Union focused on the role of coaches in society and that was also the topic for the first presidency conference in June 2017. The second presidency conference in Tartu, the “city of good thoughts”, in September 2017 focused more broadly on dual careers and healthy lifestyle and – significantly to our sector – produced a new advocacy tool for health enhancing physical activity. The conference gathered policy makers, athletes and sport administrators to discuss how to battle the growing trend of physical inactivity among Europeans, but most importantly, it provided the backdrop for an announcement on a new joint action plan. The Tartu Call for a Healthy Lifestyle brings together three EU Commissions to provide a roadmap of concrete (and sometimes not so concrete) actions towards a healthier population. Tibor Navracsics, the Commissioner for Education, Culture, Youth and Sport, Vytenis Andriukaitis, the Commissioner for Health and Food Safety, and Mario Milouchev, representing the Commissioner for Agriculture and Rural Development, all signed the call at the conference. With the promise of more funding and regular meetings to discuss challenges revolving around promoting and attaining healthy lifestyles, it will surely create more visibility and bring these sectors together to fight the inactivity pandemic. The cost of inactivity is too high for us to ignore, as Europe can’t afford the 500 000 deaths and 80 billion euros it costs annually. These numbers raised the alarm already when ISCA and Cebr published the Costs of Physical Inactivity in Europe (“Inactivity Time Bomb”) research results in 2015, but it seems that the urgency has finally reached the highest political levels. The Tartu Call is therefore the latest tool our network can use to raise awareness and support for their actions. Both the Tartu Call and the draft WHO Global Action Plan on Physical Activity show the importance of having a holistic approach to solving the problem. This is where joint action plans game to play and we do hope the three involved Commissioners will remain active players. By Laura Maria Tiidla, ISCAISCA President Mogens Kirkeby comments on the Tartu Call for a Healthy Lifestyle here
    “City of good thoughts” inspires a new joint action call for a healthy lifestyle
Save the dates: No Elevators Day and MOVE Week 2018
The time to start planning your next No Elevators Day or MOVE Week event is now. The official dates for the NowWeMOVE campaign’s biggest events in the first half of 2018 are set: No Elevators Day will take place on 25 April and MOVE Week from 28 May-3 June. No Elevators Day encourages everyone to take the stairs instead of the elevator for their health and wellbeing. It is aimed at busy office workers, but anyone can take the chance to seal off an elevator or escalator in their community as a fun way to get their peers active. No Elevators Day will go global in 2018 – stay tuned for more information. MOVE Week was established in 2012, so 2018 will be the 7th edition. Thousands of events take place simultaneously across Europe in a week-long festival of sport and physical activity. They can include open door or “try-it” events at local clubs, walking events, fun runs, bike tours, street sport events, school sports events, company activities, activities organised for hard-to-reach groups – the possibilities are only limited to our imaginations! Anyone can register as a MOVE Agent: sport clubs, schools, individuals, municipalities, companies – anyone with an interest in promoting physical activity in their communities.Find out how you can get involved in No Elevators Day Download all the resources you need to organise your own MOVE Week event

You will like working with us!

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Navigate through the ISCA Youth portal

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The best way to look back at the grassroots sport sector

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The 6th European edition of NowWeMOVE’s signature event MOVE Week was on 29 May-4 June 2017. Stay tuned for the dates for 2018. and MOVE Week in Latin America (Semana Muévela and Semana MOVE Brasil) took place from 23-30 September 2017.

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Good Governance in Grassroots Sport Self Assessment Tool: an interactive online tool providing a range of information and templates across three themes of governance and four principles. Start your self-assessment now!

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OTHER ISCA ACTIVITIES

Inactivity Time Bomb

In 2015, ISCA commissioned a study called the 'Economic Cost of Physical Inactivity in Europe', showing that half a million Europeans die every year as a result of being physically inactive. The most common causes of death are from those diseases linked to being physically inactive, such as coronary heart disease, type II diabetes and colorectal and breast cancer. One in four adults across Europe is currently physically inactive – as are four out of five adolescents.

 

Download the full report and infographics at the official microsite http://inactivity-time-bomb.nowwemove.com/

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MOVE&Learn

Training on-line tool for non-formal Education through Sport and physical activities with young people.

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