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  • Physical activity promoters from six continents made their MOVE at the MOVE Congress 2017
    The MOVE Congress 2017 in Birmingham, UK, from 4-6 October gathered stakeholders in grassroots sport and physical activity from six continents and countries as far and wide as New Zealand, Costa Rica, the US and Brazil. From transforming the Birmingham Council House’s Banqueting Hall into a 5Rhythms “ISCA Disco” at the opening session, to presentations that got the participants thinking and sharing their views, to more dancing with a Bhangra and barn dance workshop at the networking dinner – the 8th MOVE Congress upheld its tradition as one of the most active conferences in the world. It is, after all, our human right to MOVE. So there was no stopping us.
    Physical activity promoters from six continents made their MOVE at the MOVE Congress 2017
  • “Birmingham hasn’t seen an opening of a congress life this before”: MOVE Congress 2017 starts with a celebration of MOVEment
    It’s our human right to move – so what’s stopping us? MOVE Congress 2017 facilitator Sean Blair from ProMeet greeted this year’s delegates when they arrived with a call to move. And before the opening speeches even began, Birmingham Council House’s banqueting hall had transformed into a dance floor led by Neil Pinnock from 5Rhythms and six of his co-dancers. “I don’t think the city has seen an opening of a Congress like this”, Birmingham Councillor Ian Ward said after the conga lines and free flowing dances had murmured to an end. The opening of the eighth MOVE Congress was a fitting start, he said, to an event drawing attention to the benefits of physical activity in a city that is trying to find innovative ways of “getting people to move in ways that suit them”.This year’s MOVE Congress will put the spotlight on initiatives from Birmingham, other parts of the UK and further abroad that are removing barriers that typically stop people from moving: from social, to socio-economic, to distance and cost, as Ward noted. “We are focusing on removing these barriers and making many activities free to residents,” he said.“Talking can only take us so far - there’s nothing like hands-on experience,” he added, referring to the ‘I’m a volunteer’ sessions, in which the Congress delegates will go to visit different community initiatives as part of the conference.In the opening reception, the delegates also had a taste of Bhangra dancing, which they will also have a chance to try themselves part of the MOVE Congress networking event this evening. “The topic of this year’s MOVE Congress is the Human Right to MOVE,” ISCA President Mogens Kirkeby said in his opening speech. “But it is more about us assisting citizens in exercising this human right.” The next two days will explore topics such as MOVEment Spaces, reaching hard-to-reach groups, physical activities in schools and a session led by the Wild Network rethinking physical activity in urban and natural spaces. Find out more about the MOVE Congress here See photos from the event on our ISCA Facebook page (updated daily) Watch video highlights of the opening here Article by Rachel Payne, ISCAPhotos by Georgi Lazarov, Punkt
    “Birmingham hasn’t seen an opening of a congress life this before”: MOVE Congress 2017 starts with a celebration of MOVEment
  • Copenhagen Runners High took local runners to new heights for European Week of Sport
    On Saturday 30 September, ISCA member DGI organised a good example of a small scale event during the European Week of Sport, the Copenhagen Runners High. The event was an urban trail run in Nordhavn, Copenhagen, which took a place in a very unusual location and challenged the runners in a different way from most running events. The Copenhagen Runners High race was special because the runners had to climb up 136 steps to the top of Luders rooftop square. The race consisted of 5 laps of a 1.2km route in a very urban location. The Luders building consists of a parking hall and a rooftop complete with a workout area. Children, adults and seniors can all use the facilities for free. The event is a good example of how urban spaces can be used for being physically active, and that it is not necessary go to a sports facility in order to be physically active. Despite the strong wind, the sun was shining and the event attracted over 150 runners. The ISCA team was present and encouraged people to try out some European Fitness Badge exercises. Overall the event was a big success and is part of a series of similar trail runs in locations around Copenhagen. Find out more about the European Week of Sport in Denmark (coordinated by ISCA) Find out more about Copenhagen Runners High By Kreetta Lapinniemi, ISCA 
    Copenhagen Runners High took local runners to new heights for European Week of Sport
  • "Civil society is a critical player in physical activity promotion": Interview with Jo Jewell from WHO Europe
    On Wednesday WHO Europe welcomed ISCA and the Ollerup Academy of Physical Education at the UN headquarters (UN City) in Copenhagen ready for an active lunch hour with colleagues from around the world.WHO Europe Technical Officer Jo Jewell helped spread the #BeActive message as he worked his way around the Ollerup students’ and ISCA’s 10 active stations. Jewell tells us why he believes it’s so important for NGOs big and small to be “critical players” in raising awareness about the health benefits of physical activity and influencing policy and actions from governments. ISCA: How do you see physical activity as part of the bigger picture of health and wellbeing?Jo Jewell: For the European region and for the European member states it’s certainly absolutely essential, really. If you look at the burden of disease in the European region the most important causes of death and disability are non-communicable diseases, so heart disease, cancers, diabetes, and physical inactivity and sedentary behaviours are some of the most important risk factors contributing to that burden of disease. So getting populations more active and building urban environments and cities where people can be physically active as part of everyday life is extremely important. So activities both to promote awareness around physical activity, but also to create the infrastructure for people to be physically active is essential. ISCA: And how important is civil society’s role in doing this activation and physical activity promotion, and providing the infrastructure?Jo Jewell: Absolutely important on many different fronts. On the first aspect you mentioned in terms of creating awareness, I think that weeks like the European week of physical activity and sport are extremely important, both in terms of raising awareness with national governments about the need to take some actions, but also with the public, reminding them of the importance of being physically active. But then also civil society is a critical player in terms of reviewing evidence, looking at potential solutions, being creative and thinking out of the box about ways we can address this issue of physical inactivity, being advocates for things like cycling infrastructure and being advocates for better planning in terms of new housing developments, etc. So in that sense civil society is a crucial partner. ISCA: Would you have one piece of advice for smaller NGOs who would like to be advocates but maybe think they’re too small to do so?Jo Jewell: I think every voice counts and I think [it’s important to] find your target audience. I think of course, when we talk about physical inactivity, that’s an issue we’re facing across a life course, across different socio-economic groups, etc. So in that sense there are many different potential target groups. Whether you want to work with low socio-economic groups, whether you want to work with children, older adolescents, older people, for example. Keeping people physically active in later in life is extremely important. So in that sense, perhaps smaller civil society organisations could create a niche and focus their efforts towards one specific group and then tailor their messages and activities to address the needs of that group in particular. ISCA: In the context of the European Week of Sport and EU initiatives and also the latest WHO Global Action Plan to Promote Physical Activity, how do you see the links between those two and how can they support each other?Jo Jewell: I think that every action that keeps physical activity on the agenda is really important and aligning the priorities is essential. So in the sense that we, as a European region, have our physical activity strategy for the European region, which sets out a number of priorities such as promoting physical activity across the life course, reaching vulnerable groups, building environments that support physical activity, I think those are the messages that can be picked up by governments but also picked up by civil society. And each year and when the physical activity week of sport comes up, I think that’s an opportunity to remind communities and society as a whole of the importance of promoting physical activity. Read more about ISCA and the Ollerup students’ visit to UN City Find out about other events held during the European Week of Sport in Denmark Interview by Rachel Payne, ISCAPhotos my Laura Maria Tiidla and Rachel Payne 
    "Civil society is a critical player in physical activity promotion": Interview with Jo Jewell from WHO Europe
  • ISCA and Ollerup students make UN City in Copenhagen a #BeActive hub
    With support from WHO Europe and the Ollerup Academy of Physical Education, the most active day of the year – 27 September – came to life at UN City in Copenhagen during an extraordinary lunch hour. ISCA entered the building with 60 students from Ollerup, who set up 10 #BeActive stations in the foyer and surprised staff from different UN departments and WHO Europe with ISCA’s FlashMOVE, which was the official flash mob for the European Week of Sport in 2016. Soon, ISCA’s EVS volunteers and the Ollerup students were accompanied by several staff who wanted to try a hoola-hoop, spinning a baton, boxing and salsa. They also let loose in the typically formal surroundings, playing favourites such as football, volleyball and table tennis in front of the reception desk. The European Fitness Badge fitness tests got staff flying in the air with post-it notes in hand – swatting them as high on the wall as they could. It was a battle, and WHO Europe Technical Officer for Nutrition, Jo Jewell (pictured below), was one of the day’s highest jumpers. He is also a great supporter of the battle against physical inactivity and aims through his work to support advocacy efforts among civil society organisations to influence policy in this field. “Civil society is a critical player in terms of reviewing evidence, looking at potential solutions, being creative and thinking out of the box about ways we can address this issue of physical inactivity,” Jewell says, referring to the increasing prevalence of inactivity-related health problems. “In the European region the most important causes of death and disability are non-communicable diseases, so heart disease, cancers, diabetes, and physical inactivity and sedentary behaviours are some of the most important risk factors contributing to that burden of disease. So getting populations more active and building urban environments and cities where people can be physically active as part of everyday life is extremely important.” For our sector in Europe, Wednesday 27 September has been the most active day in the year, coinciding with the European Week of Sport, NowWeMOVE campaign events the FlashMOVE and European Fitness Day, and the ukactive initiative National Fitness Day. September has also been an important month for the WHO and the EU, who have each moved forward with respective plans to introduce a WHO Global Action Plan to Promote Physical Activity and the EU’s Tartu Call for a Healthy Lifestyle. Jewell says he believes every governmental and non-governmental action counts when it comes to physical activity promotion. “I think weeks like the European week of physical activity and sport are extremely important, both in terms of raising awareness with national governments about the need to take some action, but also with the public, reminding them of the importance of being physically active,” he says. See our full gallery of photos from the ISCA, Ollerup and WHO Europe event at UN City on our Facebook pageFind out more about WHO Europe, UN City and the European Week of Sport in Denmark hereISCA is the official coordinator of the European Week of Sport in Denmark 
    ISCA and Ollerup students make UN City in Copenhagen a #BeActive hub
Physical activity promoters from six continents made their MOVE at the MOVE Congress 2017
The MOVE Congress 2017 in Birmingham, UK, from 4-6 October gathered stakeholders in grassroots sport and physical activity from six continents and countries as far and wide as New Zealand, Costa Rica, the US and Brazil. From transforming the Birmingham Council House’s Banqueting Hall into a 5Rhythms “ISCA Disco” at the opening session, to presentations that got the participants thinking and sharing their views, to more dancing with a Bhangra and barn dance workshop at the networking dinner – the 8th MOVE Congress upheld its tradition as one of the most active conferences in the world. It is, after all, our human right to MOVE. So there was no stopping us.

You will like working with us!

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Navigate through the ISCA Youth portal

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The best way to look back at the grassroots sport sector

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The 6th European edition of NowWeMOVE’s signature event MOVE Week was on 29 May-4 June 2017. Stay tuned for the dates for 2018. and MOVE Week in Latin America (Semana Muévela and Semana MOVE Brasil) will take place from 23-30 September 2017.

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The MOVE Congress 2017 will be held in Birmingham, UK, from 4-6 October. Registration is now open and the theme is the Human Right to MOVE. Visit the official MOVE Congress website for more information.

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Good Governance in Grassroots Sport Self Assessment Tool: an interactive online tool providing a range of information and templates across three themes of governance and four principles. Start your self-assessment now!

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OTHER ISCA ACTIVITIES

Inactivity Time Bomb

In 2015, ISCA commissioned a study called the 'Economic Cost of Physical Inactivity in Europe', showing that half a million Europeans die every year as a result of being physically inactive. The most common causes of death are from those diseases linked to being physically inactive, such as coronary heart disease, type II diabetes and colorectal and breast cancer. One in four adults across Europe is currently physically inactive – as are four out of five adolescents.

 

Download the full report and infographics at the official microsite http://inactivity-time-bomb.nowwemove.com/

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MOVE&Learn

Training on-line tool for non-formal Education through Sport and physical activities with young people.

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